[ASC-media] EXTRA Radio Release 1 March NewScientist

RBI - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Thu Feb 27 14:07:45 EST 2003


RADIO EXTRA STORIES FROM 1 MARCH 2003 ISSUE
 
 
 
FIGHTING OVER PHARMING Fears that GM plants used for the production of
pharmaceuticals could end up in our food have led to calls for the US
Department of Agriculture to toughen up its rules governing pharming. Pages
22-23
 
TOO BUSY TO SPOT SMALLPOX Public health officials in the US are too busy
vaccinating people against smallpox to watch for an actual outbreak. Health
officials say that projects aimed at responding to bioterror attacks are
being delayed or shelved because of the vaccination workload. Page 10
 
LARVAE RESIST THE MIGHT OF THE SEA Miniscule larvae don't just drift with
ocean currents. They actually stay surprisingly close to home. This finding,
by Californian researchers, could help marine biologists persuade local
authorities and fishermen to support the establishment of marine reserves.
Page 20
 
LAKE KIVU COULD POWER ALL OF RWANDA Tapping Lake Kivu's abundant supply of
dissolved methane gas could provide electricity for much of Rwanda, reduce
the logging that is devastating its forests, and quash the risk of a natural
gas explosion. Page 17
 
HOW TO STEAL A "PIN" IN JUST 15 ATTEMPTS A weakness in bank security could
make it possible for a corrupt employee to guess the PIN number to a
customer's card in an average of 15 attempts. Page 7
 
ARE TROOPS AT RISK OF GULF WAR SYNDROME II? Troops sent to fight in Iraq
will risk contracting the same mysterious illnesses that plague some
veterans of the 1991Gulf War. Although the armed forces say they have taken
extra precautions and collected more health records this time, veterans'
advocates claim they have done too little too late. Page 11
 
NEEDLES NOT SEX DROVE AFRICAN AIDS PANDEMIC The re-use of dirty needles in
healthcare-not promiscuity-was the main cause of the spread of AIDS in
Africa, according to a controversial new analysis. So should prevention now
focus on safe sex programs or providing single-use needles? Editorial, and
New Scientist's free public website at http://www.newscientist.com
 

GENE SILENCING GAINS STRENGTH IN NUMBERS An American biotech company says it
has developed a way to make RNA interference more effective. The technique,
which involves designing molecular "smart bombs" to switch off individual
genes, holds vast promise for medicine. Page 23


 

"IT'S YOUR BANK MANAGER..." (short story) Although phone companies already
provide "caller ID", wouldn't it be better if your phone shouted the name of
the caller when it rang? AT&T has patented this idea in new phones which
come with a voice synthesiser. Page 16
 
EMISSION CONTROL The discovery of a long-sought-after cluster of cells in
the spine could spell the end of frustration for men suffering from
premature ejaculation. For some paralysed men, it could mean the difference
between having children or not. Pages 36-38
 
 
For information on how to view these articles on our Internet Press Site OR
for contacts and interviews, please contact Claire Bowles, New Scientist
press officer. Tel: +44 20 7331 2751 or Email:
<mailto:claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk> claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk
 
IN AUSTRALIA - Jo Garman 02 9422 2897 or media at newscientist.com.au
IN NEW ZEALAND - Monica Dwyer: 09 625 3075 or mdwyer at gordongotch.co.nz
 
 
 
RADIO EXTRA STORIES FROM 1 MARCH 2003 ISSUE
 
 
 
FIGHTING OVER PHARMING Fears that GM plants used for the production of
pharmaceuticals could end up in our food have led to calls for the US
Department of Agriculture to toughen up its rules governing pharming. Pages
22-23
 
TOO BUSY TO SPOT SMALLPOX Public health officials in the US are too busy
vaccinating people against smallpox to watch for an actual outbreak. Health
officials say that projects aimed at responding to bioterror attacks are
being delayed or shelved because of the vaccination workload. Page 10
 
LARVAE RESIST THE MIGHT OF THE SEA Miniscule larvae don't just drift with
ocean currents. They actually stay surprisingly close to home. This finding,
by Californian researchers, could help marine biologists persuade local
authorities and fishermen to support the establishment of marine reserves.
Page 20
 
LAKE KIVU COULD POWER ALL OF RWANDA Tapping Lake Kivu's abundant supply of
dissolved methane gas could provide electricity for much of Rwanda, reduce
the logging that is devastating its forests, and quash the risk of a natural
gas explosion. Page 17
 
HOW TO STEAL A "PIN" IN JUST 15 ATTEMPTS A weakness in bank security could
make it possible for a corrupt employee to guess the PIN number to a
customer's card in an average of 15 attempts. Page 7
 
ARE TROOPS AT RISK OF GULF WAR SYNDROME II? Troops sent to fight in Iraq
will risk contracting the same mysterious illnesses that plague some
veterans of the 1991Gulf War. Although the armed forces say they have taken
extra precautions and collected more health records this time, veterans'
advocates claim they have done too little too late. Page 11
 
NEEDLES NOT SEX DROVE AFRICAN AIDS PANDEMIC The re-use of dirty needles in
healthcare-not promiscuity-was the main cause of the spread of AIDS in
Africa, according to a controversial new analysis. So should prevention now
focus on safe sex programs or providing single-use needles? Editorial, and
New Scientist's free public website at http://www.newscientist.com
 

GENE SILENCING GAINS STRENGTH IN NUMBERS An American biotech company says it
has developed a way to make RNA interference more effective. The technique,
which involves designing molecular "smart bombs" to switch off individual
genes, holds vast promise for medicine. Page 23


 

"IT'S YOUR BANK MANAGER..." (short story) Although phone companies already
provide "caller ID", wouldn't it be better if your phone shouted the name of
the caller when it rang? AT&T has patented this idea in new phones which
come with a voice synthesiser. Page 16
 
EMISSION CONTROL The discovery of a long-sought-after cluster of cells in
the spine could spell the end of frustration for men suffering from
premature ejaculation. For some paralysed men, it could mean the difference
between having children or not. Pages 36-38
 
 
For information on how to view these articles on our Internet Press Site OR
for contacts and interviews, please contact Claire Bowles, New Scientist
press officer. Tel: +44 20 7331 2751 or Email:
<mailto:claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk> claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk
 
IN AUSTRALIA - Jo Garman 02 9422 2897 or media at newscientist.com.au
IN NEW ZEALAND - Monica Dwyer: 09 625 3075 or mdwyer at gordongotch.co.nz
 
 
 
 
 
Jo Garman | Media Manager
NewScientist Magazine
 
ph: +61 (0)2 9422 2897 | fx: +61 (0)2 9422 2725
email: joanne at newscientist.com.au
 
Tower 2 | 475 Victoria Ave | Chatswood  NSW  2067 | Australia
 
 

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