[ASC-media] STORIES FROM 18 JANUARY 2003 ISSUE - NewScientist

Sapier, Jeff (RBI - AUS) Jeff at NewScientist.com.au
Thu Jan 16 14:46:47 EST 2003


NewScientist Media Release 18 January 2003

SPECIAL REPORT ON CENSORING SCIENCE: RECIPES FOR BIOTERROR The free exchange
of information is a cornerstone of scientific culture. The problem is that a
lot of biotech research could be put to destructive use. Scientists don't
even agree on the need for censorship, let alone the means. Pages 10-11

ALTERED BEET IS A HAVEN FOR WILDLIFE Herbicide-resistant sugar beet is
challenging the idea that GM crops are bad for wildlife. Experimental fields
in the UK are alive with weeds and beetles, showing for the first time how a
GM crop might benefit the environment by supporting greater diversity
without sacrificing yields. Page 6

CAN SHIPS SWAP MOORING ROPES FOR GIANT ELECTROMAGNETS? The press of a button
could soon be all it takes to keep a giant ship secured to the dockside. The
port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands is getting ready to test a series of
strong electromagnets built into the quay to moor giant container ships. If
it works, the system could save on labour costs and speed turnaround times.
Page 18

'SPACE SHEEPDOGS' CLEAR UP EARTH'S ORBITAL JUNKYARD? A California company
has come up with a novel way to deal with the space junk, which poses an
increasingly serious danger to spacecraft. It proposes to send up what it
calls a "space sheepdog" to usher the junk safely out of orbit. Page 13

RAVINES HINT AT GAS AVALANCHES ON MARS A Melbourne geologist claims pictures
from Mars show gullies forming at a time of year too cold for them to be
carved by liquid water. They are likely to have been created by carbon
dioxide, he says. If he's right, it would be a serious blow for the idea
that life could exist on Mars. Page 15

HOW RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT IS FINGERING ILLEGAL DRUG DEALERS Forensic
scientists in Sydney are using the rate at which radioactive fallout from
cold war nuclear tests is taken up by plants to pinpoint precisely when
drugs were grown. Page 16

GOING BANANAS It's the world's favourite fruit and it's in trouble. The
banana could disappear forever in 10 years. It lacks the genetic diversity
to fight off pests and diseases that are invading banana plantations and
smallholdings throughout Central America, Africa and Asia. New Scientist
investigates what we can do. Pages 26-29

ELECTRIC PAPER Swedish researchers have printed cheap, electronic displays
on paper, paving the way for moving images, and changing colours and text on
everything from wallpaper to milk cartons and advertising billboards. Pages
34-35

ANTIPODES: PLANTS CAN SHOW THE WAY Ian Lowe considers an energy alternative
to fossil fuels-mimicking photosynthesis. Page 49

DATA STORED IN MULTIPLYING BACTERIA A message encoded in DNA can be stored
within bacteria and then retrieved accurately, US scientists have shown. The
researchers are trying to devise a new type of memory because of concerns
that all current ways of storing information, from paper to electronic
memory, could easily be lost or destroyed. See also... Democracy in the
wild; Fat reduces life; Bloggers blocked. New Scientist's free public
website at http://www.newscientist.com

For information on how to view these articles on our Internet Press Site OR
for contacts and interviews, please contact Claire Bowles, New Scientist
press officer. Tel: +44 20 7331 2751 or Email: claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk
<mailto:claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk> 

IN AUSTRALIA - Jeff Sapier: 02 9422 2556 or jeff at newscientist.com.au
IN NEW ZEALAND - Monica Dwyer: 09 625 3075 or mdwyer at gordongotch.co.nz


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