[ASC-media] RADIO EXTRA NewScientist 25 January

Garman, Joanne (RBI - AUS) Joanne at NewScientist.com.au
Thu Jan 23 16:02:09 EST 2003


RADIO EXTRA STORIES FROM 25 JANUARY 2003 ISSUE



FANTASTIC PLASTIC Move over silicon there's a new chip on the block. And a
physicist in California is using it to help nanotechnologists shrink a
laboratory to the size of a fingernail. Pages 36-39

JUST ADD WATER TO GENERATE ELECTRICITY Indian scientists this week reported
that flushing water past a bundle of carbon nanotubes makes them generate a
current. This may one day lead to a new breed of implants powered by the
flow of body fluids. Page 12

THE SURFACE WITH TWO SELFS A smart surface that either attracts or repels
water at the flick of a switch could be used to separate biological mixtures
or make a programmable printing press. Page 20

PHYSICISTS PRACTISE THEIR NUT CONTROL Shake a can of mixed nuts and
generally the largest ones rise to the top. But if you shake hard enough,
you can reverse the effect. This discovery should help improve industrial
processes, such as mixing cement, as well as ensuring all the peanuts don't
end up on the bottom of your party fare. Page 17

STAY PUT FOR SUCCESS (short story) If your team is moving to a plush new
sports stadium, beware. It might just cost you the premiership. Research in
the US has shown that changing grounds can have a dramatic effect on
performance. Page 24

DON'T ASK WHAT'S IN THE TOILET A 'green roof' that cleans up waste bath
water for flushing toilets has been developed in London. The roof water
stays at a temperature of around 5° C, helping to keep the house warm in
winter and cool in summer. Page 14

BUG DINES ON DIOXINS Dioxins, some of the most harmful and persistent of
pollutants, may finally have met their match-a bacterium that digests them.
Page 21

FROM BONE TO BRAIN Autopsies on four women have shown that bone marrow stem
cells don't just turn into blood and bone-they can become brain cells too.
The discovery could lead to new treatments for brain damage and degenerative
diseases, such as Alzheimer's. Page 24, and New Scientist's free public
website at http://www.newscientist.com

CULTURE SHOCK India is facing a growing HIV epidemic and it appears that
traditions that subordinate a woman's role in society are to blame. New
Scientist looks at how the epidemic is forcing India to face some
uncomfortable truths about its society. Pages 42-45

MARIJUANA'S LINK TO HARD DRUG USE NOT GENETIC The reason why young cannabis
users are more likely to progress to harder drugs is not strongly linked to
genetics, a new American study of twins has shown. New Scientist's free
public website at http://www.newscientist.com



For information on how to view these articles on our Internet Press Site OR
for contacts and interviews, please contact Claire Bowles, New Scientist
press officer. Tel: +44 20 7331 2751 or Email: claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk
<mailto:claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk>


IN AUSTRALIA - Jo Garman: 02 9422 2897 or joanne at newscientist.com.au
IN NEW ZEALAND - Monica Dwyer: 09 625 3075 or mdwyer at gordongotch.co.nz





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