[ASC-media] 25 OCTOBER 2003 ISSUE - RADIO EXTRA

Sapier, Jeff (RBI - AUS) Jeff at NewScientist.com.au
Thu Oct 23 12:16:17 EST 2003


RADIO EXTRA STORIES FROM 25 OCTOBER 2003 ISSUE


DESTROYING ANTIBIOTICS MAKES THEM WORK BETTER Most of an antibiotic is
absorbed in the upper gut, but some reaches the lower gut, where it cannot
be taken up. Instead, it kills countless useful gut bacteria, and can cause
stomach upsets. Now a Finnish company has developed a pill which allows
antibiotics to be absorbed as usual, but inactivates any drug that reaches
the lower gut. Page 14

ROBOT SKIN STRETCHES TO THE TASK American researchers have found a solution
to the difficult requirements of robot skin, which needs to be elastic
enough to allow movement and rigid enough to carry and protect the wiring
needed to sense its environment. Their answer is to build electrical wires
from broad corrugated metal strips that can stretch twice their length and
still conduct electricity. Page 25

COMPUTER GAMES CAN TREAT PHOBIAS Popular computer games could provide a
cheap and effective treatment for people with debilitating phobias, say
Canadian computer scientists. New Scientist's free public website at
http://www.newscientist.com <http://www.newscientist.com> 

TABS ON TEENS Finnish parents may be able to check on the whereabouts of
their offspring via the mobile phones the children carry, under legislation
proposed for discussion by the country's parliament next month. Page 5

FISH FARM DANGER The release or escape of fish from aquaculture could send
wild populations into terminal decline, says a researcher from Northern
Ireland. Page 4

ANCIENT BIRDS LEGGED IT TO TAKE WING A Canadian postgraduate student has
found that the first birds used their legs to help them fly, thus helping to
resolve a long running debate on how flight evolved. Page 15

SLUGS (short story) If you want to eat slugs, you must cook them first. A
young Australian who did not do so recently was taken to hospital suffering
meningitis. Page 12

VEGGIE MONSTERS Giant dinosaurs prospered in the mid-Cretaceous because the
abundant vegetation grew three times as fast as today, says a US researcher.
Page 10

"MORTAR CAM" PUTS EYE IN THE SKY (short story) A digital camera, signal
processor, transmitter and parachute have been stored into a 15-centimetre
mortar shell. The idea is to give troops an aerial view of a battlefield.
Page 24

TEA AT THE SPEED OF ESPRESSO (short story) A company in the UK has taken
espresso technology to new heights. It is promising a good tasting cup of
tea-within 30 seconds. Page 25

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