[ASC-media] RADIO EXTRA: 24 APRIL 2004

Sapier, Jeff (RBI - AUS) Jeff at NewScientist.com.au
Fri Apr 23 10:00:35 EST 2004


RADIO EXTRA: STORIES FROM 24 APRIL 2004 ISSUE


WHY OCEANS BEHAVE LIKE WATER IN THE BATHTUB Using satellite measurements,
British researchers have show that oceans are rising higher at the coasts
than in the middle. This is thought to be a consequence of global warming.
The team suggests oceans are behaving like water in a bathtub. Splashing
creates waves which travel outwards and then run around the rim of the tub.
Page 16

'WEIRD' METEORITE FROM MARS MOON A meteorite that fell on Yemen in 1980
could have come from Phobos, the larger of the two Martian moons. After two
decades of puzzling over the mystery rock, a Russian researcher believes it
to be the only piece of rock to have been found on Earth from a Martian
moon. Page 17

A LOCK WITH TWO KEYS (short story) Most people worry about handing their
house keys over to builders while they are out at work all day. Now, a
British inventor has found a solution to the problem - a lock system with
two keys. When a key is lent, you slide a mechanical lever hidden inside the
lock to one side to accept that one key. When the key is returned, the
levers are slid back, rendering the borrowed key useless. Page 25

RADIO FREEDOM A technology that first emerged in the 1970s, that smears
short pulse radio signals across the whole spectrum, could turn the skies
into data superhighways. So why has it been marred by restrictions and
controversy? Pages 28-31

PARTICLE PHYSICISTS RESCUE RARE VINYL RECORDINGS Classic audio recordings
preserved on warped and damaged records could yet be rescued for future
generation using an optical analysis technique originally developed to keep
track of subatomic particles. New Scientist's free public website at
http://www.newscientist.com <http://www.newscientist.com> 

WHEN ANTIMATTER ATTACKS... When antimatter meets matter the result is
annihilation. But exploding isn't all they do together. Something strange
happens just before the particles collide, allowing a hybrid to form. The
process could open up a whole new kind of chemistry. Pages 34-37

SUGARY START MAKES FOR A PAINLESS SHOT It might be better to give your
children sweets before they have an injection, rather than after, according
to some American research. That's because sweets can act like painkillers in
children, and the more they like them, the better they work. Page 19

INTERVIEW: WE HOLD THESE FREEDOMS TO BE SELF-EVIDENT... Do you want to block
traumatic memories from scarring your mind? Would you be happy if someone
else did it for you? Mind control is becoming smarter by the minute, says
Richard Glen Boire, and we ain't seen nothing yet... Pages 46-49

LIFE-SAVING CHUTES TO RESCUE JET PLANES A light aircraft rescue system is
proving so successful at saving lives that its US inventors are now planning
a version for small jets. When a pilot loses control, or the engine cuts
out, the system deploys a parachute that bring the whole aircraft down
safely. Page 25

COMMENT AND ANALYSIS: A BAD CASE OF NOT ASKING FOR CONSENT Artificial blood
could be a real life saver, but efforts to develop it are dogged by ethical
pitfalls. Over the next few months victims of serious accidents in certain
US will find themselves enrolled in a trial to test a product designed to
mimic human blood-with or without their consent. Pages 20-21


PLEASE MENTION NEW SCIENTIST AS THE SOURCE OF ALL ITEMS AND, IF PUBLISHING
ONLINE, PLEASE CARRY A HYPERLINK TO: http://www.newscientist.com
<http://www.newscientist.com> 
For contacts and interviews:
in Australia: 	   Kristy Bain - Media Manager:  +61 (0)2 9422 2897 or
media at newscientist.com.au <mailto:media at newscientist.com.au> 
in New Zealand:   Marion Karalus: +64 (0)9 625 3075 or
Mkaralus at gordongotch.co.nz <mailto:Mkaralus at gordongotch.co.nz> 
in the UK (and for access to the press website):  Claire Bowles - Press
Officer: +44 (0)20 7331 2751 or claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk
<mailto:claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk> 

NewScientist proudly supports 
Australian Museum Eureka Prizes - rewarding outstanding science
 




This e-mail is for the use of the intended recipient(s) only.  If you have
received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately and then
delete it.  If you are not the intended recipient, you must not use, disclose
or distribute this e-mail without the author's permission.  We have taken
precautions to minimise the risk of transmitting software viruses, but we
advise you to carry out your own virus checks on any attachment to this e-mail.
We cannot accept liability for any loss or damage caused by software viruses.
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.asc.asn.au/pipermail/asc-media/attachments/20040423/9d86bb6f/attachment.html


More information about the ASC-media mailing list