[ASC-media] NEWSCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 14 AUGUST ISSUE

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Thu Aug 12 09:43:01 EST 2004


NEWSCIENTIST STORIES FROM 14 AUGUST 2004 ISSUE

CHEATING IS EASIER THAN YOU THINK A controversial Australian study initiated
by New Scientist shows steroids can boost athletic performance dramatically
in just three weeks. Even low doses of testosterone can result in a big lift
in performance in a fraction of the time previously thought necessary. This
might explain how some athletes dodge drug tests. The study, which is the
subject of a television documentary called High Performance being shown on
Fox 8, monitored the performance of 18 male amateur athletes over a six-week
training regime. It also looked at effects on the mood, personality and
immune systems of the participants. The findings reinforce calls for a
strengthening of drug-testing regimes. Pages 6-7, and Editorial...see also
TRIUMPH OF THE MACHINES Just how much further can the human body be pushed?
The answer is not much, but that won't stop the records from tumbling at the
Olympic Games in Athens, thanks to the ingenious use of technology. New
Scientist asks if technology has stolen the soul of sport. Pages 31-33

IVF RAISES RISK OF BIRTH DEFECT Children conceived using IVF are nine times
as likely as those conceived naturally to carry the rare disorder
Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, according to a Melbourne study. It is the
strongest evidence yet that IVF children have a higher risk of a specific
disorder. Page 11

CORALS CHANGE PARTNERS TO COPE WITH THE HEAT Global warming does not spell
imminent doom for the world's coral reefs. American researchers have found
that corals may be able to survive the higher temperatures by forming new
symbiotic relationships with algae that can take the heat. Page 9

SOME DOLPHINS ARE THE LIFE AND SOUL OF THE PARTY A British study conducted
in New Zealand has shown that just a few genial individuals keep dolphin
societies together. If they disappear, the social cohesion of the pod
collapses. So capturing wild animals for displays in marine parks could have
devastating, unforeseen consequences for those left behind. Page 12

ROME'S ANCIENT FISHERIES CONFIRM SEA-LEVEL FEARS Coastal fish pens built by
the Romans have unexpectedly provided the most accurate method so far of
measuring changes in sea level over the past 2000 years. A Canberra
researcher has used them to show that nearly all the rise in sea-level since
Roman times has happened in the past 100 years, and is most likely the
result of human activity. Page 14

THE PLANET THAT STALKED THE EARTH After shadowing Earth for millions of
years, a rogue planet launched a cataclysmic attack. Look up, and you'll see
the aftermath-the Moon. Where this disruptive world came from has always
been a mystery. Perhaps a space rock might solve the puzzle. Pages 27-30

DEEP HEAT Icelanders are planning to flirt with disaster and drill the
hottest hole ever. Their ambitious scheme of extreme plumbing aims to bring
unimaginably hot liquids to the surface and tap their store of energy and
dissolved metals. But is it worth the risk? New Scientist investigates.
Pages 38-41 
 
ANTIPODES: SHAPING URBAN GROWTH Ian Lowe looks at the issues raised by the
development of south-east Queensland, and at how to increase the safety of
cycling. Page 45 

SKIN USED TO TRANSMIT KEY DATA Unlocking cars and activating devices could
soon be a matter of simply touching them, thanks to a German communications
system that transmits data across the skin. See also... Testing solar sails;
Hikers spread death; Atlantic ridge wonders. New Scientist's free public
website at http://www.newscientist.com <http://www.newscientist.com> 

PLEASE MENTION NEWSCIENTIST AS THE SOURCE OF ALL ITEMS, AND IF PUBLISHING
ONLINE PLEASE CARRY A HYPERLINK TO http://www.newscientist.com
<http://www.newscientist.com> 


For contacts and interviews:
Australia: 	Kristy Bain - Media Manager:  +61 (0)2 9422 2897 or
media at newscientist.com.au <mailto:media at newscientist.com.au> 
New Zealand:	Marion Karalus: +64 (0)9 625 3075 or
Mkaralus at gordongotch.co.nz <mailto:Mkaralus at gordongotch.co.nz> 
Europe (and for access to the press website):  Claire Bowles - Press
Officer: +44 (0)20 7331 2751 or claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk
<mailto:claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk> 





This e-mail is for the use of the intended recipient(s) only.  If you have
received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately and then
delete it.  If you are not the intended recipient, you must not use, disclose
or distribute this e-mail without the author's permission.  We have taken
precautions to minimise the risk of transmitting software viruses, but we
advise you to carry out your own virus checks on any attachment to this e-mail.
We cannot accept liability for any loss or damage caused by software viruses.
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.asc.asn.au/pipermail/asc-media/attachments/20040812/51a6a138/attachment.html


More information about the ASC-media mailing list