[ASC-media] RADIO EXTRA: 24 JANUARY 2004

Sapier, Jeff (RBI - AUS) Jeff at NewScientist.com.au
Thu Jan 22 12:37:09 EST 2004


RADIO EXTRA: STORIES FROM 24 JANUARY 2004 ISSUE


HOW TO SECOND-GUESS THE NEXT HACK ATTACK Mutating software could predict and
defend attacks against computers before hackers have even developed them,
American software engineers say. Their system predicts the future strategies
of hackers by taking known hacking software and systematically changing it
to find the most deadly recombinations. Page 19

WE HEAR THAT... Individual goldfish have their own unmistakable style of
swimming, say Israeli zoologists who conducted a detailed mathematical
investigation into whether any two fish swim in exactly the same way. The
results could lead to a new method for detecting water pollution. Page 9

WHAT WE GAVE UP FOR COLOUR VISION Our ability to see the world in colour
comes at a price-a diminished sense of smell. So say biologists who found
that two lineages of primates, one of which includes humans, evolved colour
vision independently, both losing much of their sense of smell. Page 12

CONSERVATION PLANS ARE FATALLY FLAWED Conservation managers are not taking
scientific evidence into account when drawing up their plans, a survey of
projects in the UK and Australia has found. Faced with species or habitats
on the brink of extinction, managers are taking emergency action which can
make the endangered entities more vulnerable in the long term. Page 13

SIMPLE SUGAR SLOWS HUNTINGTON'S (short story) Feeding the simple sugar
trehalose to mice with Huntington's disease slows brain degeneration, a
Japanese research group has found. Page 14

SLEEPING ON IT REALLY DOES HELP YOU SOLVE A PROBLEM A good night's sleep can
provide the answer you've been looking for, according to German researchers.
They found more than twice as many subjects solved a series of maths
problems after they were allowed a sleep. Page 15

SAKE SPEAKERS (short story) The difficulty with ultra-thin loudspeaker cones
made of wood is that they dry out and crack. After lengthy research, JVC of
Japan has found that marinating the wood in sake (rice wine) solves the
problem. Page 20

NUMBER OF BEASTS More and more studies are showing that babies and animals
share a remarkably similar basic knowledge of numeracy. As the study results
pour in, researchers believe they are moving closer to understanding how the
brain deals with numbers. And this could eventually yield clues as to what
goes wrong in brain disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Pages 38-41

MAGIC EYES Researchers are interested in to designing high-quality lenses
which don't move to change focus. The key is a rubber disc which controls
how light bends. These lenses could change everything from high-powered
telescopes to cheap disposable cameras. Pages 24-27

MOLE RAT'S MAGNETIC MAGIC REVEALED When it makes long underground journeys,
the blind mole rat continually monitors its direction using the Earth's
magnetic field, new Israeli research has found. It is the first animal shown
to have this ability. New Scientist's free public website at
http://www.newscientist.com <http://www.newscientist.com> 



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