[ASC-media] RADIO STORIES: NEWSCIENTIST 6 MARCH

Sapier, Jeff (RBI - AUS) Jeff at NewScientist.com.au
Thu Mar 4 12:53:48 EST 2004


RADIO EXTRA: STORIES FROM 6 MARCH 2004 ISSUE


PAINKILLER LINKED TO RISE IN OVERDOSE DEATHS Forensic scientists fear that a
huge increase in the use of methadone as a painkiller is feeding the black
market and causing an alarming rise in deaths in the US. The drug works well
as a pain reliever because it stays in the body for a long time. But this
also means accidental overdoses are common, even when the drug is
prescribed. Page 14

PRIVACY PROTECTOR IS A BOON FOR SHOPLIFTERS A chip designed to block radio
frequency ID tags in the interests of privacy could also wreak havoc with
security systems. Page 25, and New Scientist's free public website at
http://www.newscientist.com <http://www.newscientist.com> 

COMPACT FUEL CELLS MAY OUST OUT FEEBLE BATTERIES Researchers in America have
found that by shrinking the channels that deliver the hydrogen, they can
increase the power of miniature hydrogen fuel cells by up to 50 per cent. It
may be just the boost battery technology needs to keep pace with the power
demands of mobile phones. Page 23

FIGHTING FIRE WITH A STEAM MACHINE While testing the capabilities of an
engine designed for speedboats, a British company has accidentally
discovered a powerful tool for putting out fires. On dry land, when water
was squirted into the engine with a garden hose, a jet of fine droplets
emerged that drenched everyone standing within 20 metres of it-ideal for
dousing flames. Page 24

GOLD FINGERPRINT TO FOIL FORGERS "Fingerprints" based on traces of the
impurities found in gold are the latest weapon against forgers of antique
ingots. The fingerprint shows where the gold was mined, which should tally
with the location on the ingot's stamp. Page 15

SUNSCREEN PRIMES THE SKIN'S DEFENCES (short story) It might be possible to
develop sunscreens that kick-start the skin's protective mechanisms long
before you hit the beach. The secret is a fragment of DNA just two bases
long. Page 17

WHAT A DIAMOND A DAY MAKES (short story) Using a process called chemical
vapour deposition, US researchers can produce "the hardest crystals of
diamond ever reported" within a day. Page 17 

TEEN BRAINS SHOW LOW MOTIVATION Teen brains show less activity in the
regions associated with motivation, a US brain imaging study has revealed.
It may be why teenagers engage in dangerous activities such as drink
driving. New Scientist's free public website at http://www.newscientist.com
<http://www.newscientist.com>  

HOPE FOR INHERITED KIDNEY DISEASE Animal tests have raised hopes of finding
an effective drug treatment for polycystic kidney disease, one of the most
common inherited disorders worldwide. Page 8

TINY RADAR COULD MAKE DRIVING SAFER The entire functions of a radar system
have now been squeezed onto a single silicon chip. This means that
radar-based features now only available in luxury cars, such as parking aids
and systems to assist driving through fog, could become standard. New
Scientist's free public website at http://www.newscientist.com
<http://www.newscientist.com> 



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