[ASC-media] RADIO EXTRA: NEWSCIENTIST 15 MAY 2004

Sapier, Jeff (RBI - AUS) Jeff at NewScientist.com.au
Thu May 13 12:03:02 EST 2004


RADIO EXTRA: NEWSCIENTIST STORIES FROM 15 MAY 2004 ISSUE


WHALES, SEALS OR MEN? WHO TOOK ALL THE FISH? Debates over whether fishers or
whales and seals are depleting precious fish stocks have raged for years.
But the first global study of the habits of marine mammals and fishing
fleets suggests that marine mammals and fishing fleets rarely prey on the
same fish stocks. Pages 6-7

CAN GENE THERAPY BEAT HIV? Three people with drug-resistant strains of HIV
have become the first to undergo a new form of gene therapy designed to
block replication of the virus. The approach involves exposing a patient's
immune system to a modified form of HIV. The results are so far have been
encouraging. Page 10

MICRO-SCULPTURES GIVE METAL THE VELCRO TOUCH British researchers have found
a way to sculpt delicate projections on metal surfaces. The projections
could act like an ultra-strong Velcro, allowing tough joints to form between
metal and composite materials in aircraft and cars. Page 21

MACHINES ROLL IN TO CARE FOR THE ELDERLY As people in industrialised
countries live longer, the world's population over 60 is estimated to double
by 2050. Healthcare systems will be put under severe pressure. Experts
believe the only choice will be to depend on technology to play an
increasing role in helping the elderly. Page 22

THE BODY ELECTRIC Every surface of your body from your skin to your cell
membranes is humming with electricity. Recently there has been a revival in
studying the biological effects of electric fields.
A group of researchers now believes that internal electric fields are
involved in mapping out your body plan, wound healing and nerve
regeneration. Pages 38-41

GUIDELINES FOR REBURIAL OF OLD BONES Controversial disputes over human
remains excavated from Christian graves can now be avoided in the UK.
Archaeologists and church leaders have agreed to a new set of guidelines.
Page 8

BAMBOO SEEDS ITS OWN DESTRUCTION One third of the world's species of woody
bamboo are in danger of extinction-but not everybody is sympathetic. Because
the greatest of the grasses has a capacity for mass flowering every few
decades, it can produce large quantities of seed leading to rats in plague
proportions, which in turn can spark famines that affect millions of people.
Page 12

URBAN NIGHTINGALES' SONGS ARE ILLEGALLY LOUD Urban noise can force
nightingales to sing so loudly they break European sound pollution
regulations, according to German researchers. New Scientist's free public
website at http://www.newscientist.com <http://www.newscientist.com/> 

BIRDS MIGRATE ON CHEMICAL CUE (short story) Migrating birds probably use a
chemical compass to navigate, rather than a physical one, say American
researchers. They speculate the Earth's magnetic field interacts with
pigments in birds' eyes. Page 15

MAPPING THE PATH OF CRIME EPIDEMICS If detectives modelled patterns of crime
in the same way that biologists model the spread of disease, they would be
able to predict where criminals are likely to strike with far greater
accuracy, according to a British researcher. Page 20

PLEASE MENTION NEW SCIENTIST AS THE SOURCE OF ALL ITEMS AND, IF PUBLISHING
ONLINE, PLEASE CARRY A HYPERLINK TO: http://www.newscientist.com
<http://www.newscientist.com/> 
For contacts and interviews:
in Australia: 	   Kristy Bain - Media Manager:  +61 (0)2 9422 2897 or
media at newscientist.com.au <mailto:media at newscientist.com.au> 
in New Zealand:   Marion Karalus: +64 (0)9 625 3075 or
Mkaralus at gordongotch.co.nz <mailto:Mkaralus at gordongotch.co.nz> 
in the UK (and for access to the press website):  Claire Bowles - Press
Officer: +44 (0)20 7331 2751 or claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk
<mailto:claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk> 
NewScientist proudly supports 
Australian Museum Eureka Prizes - rewarding outstanding science
 


This e-mail is for the use of the intended recipient(s) only.  If you have
received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately and then
delete it.  If you are not the intended recipient, you must not use, disclose
or distribute this e-mail without the author's permission.  We have taken
precautions to minimise the risk of transmitting software viruses, but we
advise you to carry out your own virus checks on any attachment to this e-mail.
We cannot accept liability for any loss or damage caused by software viruses.
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.asc.asn.au/pipermail/asc-media/attachments/20040513/6d7083b9/attachment.html


More information about the ASC-media mailing list