[ASC-media] Beefing Up Australia's Livestock Disease Management

Cathy Reade creade at squirrel.com.au
Tue Feb 15 14:23:49 EST 2005


Beefing Up Australia's Livestock Disease Management

An international expert in the dynamics and impacts of infectious animal
diseases, Dr Brian Perry OBE, is in Australia (meeting in Victoria, WA,
Queensland, Canberra, NSW) exploring new research opportunities for managing
disease outbreaks in Australia's livestock industries. Dr Perry is one of
the world's leading veterinary epidemiologists - scientists who study how
specific diseases spread through animal populations.

A press release put out by CSIRO and a backgrounder on Dr Perry is below.
Should you wish to interview Brian  on Australia's livestock disease
management, on new ways to protect Australia's livestock industries, on the
history of tropical livestock diseases, or on the globalisation of disease
and why tropical livestock diseases are of increasing importance globally,
could you please contact: Cathy Reade on 0413 575 934 or one of the CSIRO
contacts below.

Cathy Reade
Co-ordinator - Public Awareness
ATSE Crawford Fund
www.crawfordfund.org
Ph/Fax: 07 54483095
Mobile: 0413 575 934
Email: creade at squirrel.com.au

The ATSE Crawford Fund's mission is to increase Australians' engagement in
international agricultural research, development and education for the
benefit of developing countries and Australia.


VISIT AIDS MANAGEMENT OF ANIMAL DISEASE

An international expert in the dynamics and impacts of infectious animal
diseases, Dr Brian Perry, is in Australia working with CSIRO scientists
exploring new research opportunities for managing disease outbreaks in
Australia's livestock industries.

As the Team Leader of 'Animal Health and Food Safety for Trade' research at
the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) based in Nairobi,
Kenya, Dr Perry is one of the world's leading veterinary epidemiologists -
scientists who study how specific diseases spread through animal
populations.

Host scientist, Assistant Director of CSIRO Livestock Industries' Australian
Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL), Dr Peter Daniels, says Dr Perry will lead
CSIRO's scientists in developing a strategy designed to increase their
knowledge and skills in the roles of epidemiology in animal disease
surveillance and modelling.

"That strategy will be central to CSIRO's efforts to make valuable
contributions to epidemiological research," Dr Daniels says.

Dr Perry's visit is funded under the McMaster Fellowship Program which
provides study grants to distinguished overseas scientists selected to
support CSIRO research projects in veterinary science or agriculture.

"AAHL helps to protect international market access for Australia's livestock
and livestock products by maintaining a capability to detect and manage the
risks posed by major animal diseases," Dr Daniels says.

"Surveillance and management of animal disease increasingly requires support
from a range of different modelling skills that apply quantitative
approaches to capture and integrate knowledge from a range of disciplines.
For example, the more we know about how a particular virus spreads in a
certain climate, the better equipped we'll be to manage an outbreak."

Dr Daniels says that while CSIRO has researchers with skills in climate and
mathematical modelling, geographic information systems (GIS) and veterinary
diagnostics, many of these skills are not fully utilised in animal health
surveillance and modelling.

"Animal disease outbreaks, such as the 2001 foot and mouth disease outbreak
in the United Kingdom, are often managed with the assistance of
contributions from a variety of stakeholders and areas of expertise,
including epidemiological and economics models of intervention options.
Although Australian researchers currently have a modelling capability, it
may not capture all the potential expertise and approaches available, such
as incorporating the impact of various climatic and socio-economic
circumstances prevailing," he says.

During his visit, Dr Perry will meet with key Australian researchers in
climate modelling, GIS, remote sensing, complex system science, social
science, agricultural economics and veterinary diagnostics in Perth,
Canberra, Brisbane, Geelong and Melbourne.

"As a result of these meetings and discussions, we will develop a strategy
to integrate Australian expertise, aligning animal biosecurity surveillance
with Australia's national research priorities," Dr Daniels says.

"AAHL is a crucial part of Australia's national animal health surveillance,
collaborating extensively with other Australian research institutes. Dr
Perry's visit will help us identify Australia's veterinary epidemiology
research needs and determine the focus of CSIRO research in this area," Dr
Daniels says.

Dr Perry will be in Australia from 2 February to 2 March 2005.

The McMaster Fellowships were established by CSIRO following a bequest by a
prominent NSW grazier, Sir Frederick McMaster, of a substantial proportion
of the shares in his pastoral company.

More information:
Dr Peter Daniels, CSIRO Livestock Industries 03 5227 5272
peter.daniels at csiro.au

Media assistance:
Judith Maunders 03 5227 5426 judith.maunders at csiro.au

Background on Dr Brian Perry

Dr Perry grew up in a farming family in Norfolk, UK, and graduated as a vet
from Edinburgh University in 1969. After a period of general veterinary
practice in the UK, he specialised in tropical veterinary medicine, and
subsequently obtained Masters and Doctorate degrees, also from Edinburgh. He
spent 10 years working in Ethiopia, Colombia and Zambia on animal disease
control projects.

In 1982 he was recruited to develop teaching and research programs in
applied veterinary epidemiology at the then recently established
Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in Blacksburg,
Virginia, United States.

In 1987, Dr Perry returned to Africa as veterinary epidemiologist at the
International Laboratory for Research on Animal Diseases (ILRAD), Nairobi,
Kenya. ILRAD became ILRI in 1995, with the organisation expanding to work in
other continents and on a wider range of diseases.

Dr Perry has published more than 235 refereed journal articles, books and
proceedings papers.

He has consulted extensively to animal health projects in various countries,
including Costa Rica, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Peru, Uruguay, Egypt,
Mozambique, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Thailand, Philippines and Laos. He has
served on many expert committees of the Food and Agriculture Organisation
(FAO) and the World Health Organisation (WHO).

In 2002, Dr Perry was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire
(OBE) for services to veterinary science in developing countries. In 2004 he
won the prestigious 'Outstanding Scientist' award, presented by the global
alliance, the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research
(CGIAR).
--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.8.8 - Release Date: 14/02/2005

--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.8.8 - Release Date: 14/02/2005



More information about the ASC-media mailing list