[ASC-media] RADIO EXTRA: NEWSCIENTIST - 26 FEBRUARY 2005 ISSUE

Sapier, Jeff (RBI - AUS) Jeff at NewScientist.com.au
Thu Feb 24 10:39:33 EST 2005


RADIO EXTRA STORIES FROM 26 FEBRUARY 2005 ISSUE

(EMBARGO: NOT FOR PUBLICATION BEFORE 06:00 AEST THU 24/02/2005)


GROW YOUR OWN BONE RINGS Would you and your partner like to exchange rings
grown from each other's bone? The idea is from a UK government funded
project intended to promote awareness of the issues surrounding tissue
engineering. But the team will only get ethical approval for taking bone
samples from the couple if both people already need surgery. Page 15

MAKING THE BEST OF GARBAGE GAS Methane generated by rotting rubbish in small
landfills could be extracted and used as a viable energy supply. A British
researcher says a simple modification to the dumps will make it possible to
harvest methane that is wasted at present. Page 25

WILD SUCCESS, BUT AT A COST The largest ever release of captive chimpanzees
has been applauded as a success, with five breeding in the wild. But the
project was not without its hazards. Unfamiliar males and females prompted
vicious attacks by wild and previously released chimps. And some
conservationists say the money would have been better spent elsewhere. Page
18

SHARK SHIFTER What does it take to move a man-eating shark off your case?
New Scientist braved the shark-infested waters of the Bahamas to test out a
new chemical shark repellent that researchers claim to be the first that
actually works. Pages 40-43

BIRD FLU OUTBREAKS MAY GO UNNOTICED IN HUMANS Detecting the start of a
pandemic from a new form of bird flu virus may be harder than experts
feared. Two children in Vietnam who died of diarrhoea and brain inflammation
have been found to have had bird flu, suggesting doctors looking for typical
flu symptoms may miss cases. Page 9, and New Scientist's free public website
at <http://www.newscientist.com>

GROW YOUR OWN IMPLANTS Plastic surgeons might soon be using tissue grown
from a patient's own stem cells for breast implants, instead of silicone,
according to an American researcher who has tested the idea in mice. Page
20, and New Scientist's free public website at <http://www.newscientist.com>


THE ELECTRIC KOOL-AID CLINICAL TRIAL LSD and other psychedelic drugs were
once considered promising treatments for addiction. We could be seeing a
revival. The US Food and Drug Administration has just approve giving ecstasy
to late stage cancer patients. It may not be long before doctors around the
world are prescribing hallucinogens for a range of conditions from anxiety
to alcoholism. Pages 36-39

HUMAN 'DENTAL CHAOS' LINKED TO EVOLUTION OF COOKING Crooked and disordered
teeth may be the result of humans having evolved to eat relatively mushy
cooked food, new American research suggests. The disarray could have
developed because our front and back teeth are subject to conflicting
evolutionary pressures. New Scientist's free public website at
<http://www.newscientist.com>

FOUND, A GALAXY WITHOUT STARS A newly found galaxy consists of enough
hydrogen gas and dark matter to form tens of millions of stars, but it's
totally devoid of them. If this British discovery is confirmed it will
vindicate the favoured theory of how galaxies form-and present fresh
puzzles. Pages 6-7

GOOD NEWS FOR FANS OF THE BLACK STUFF Drinking coffee may reduce your risk
of liver cancer. A massive Japanese study has found that, compared with less
frequent drinkers, middle-aged and elderly people who drink coffee daily
have half the rate of common liver cancer. Page 21 

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