[ASC-media] Young Scientist of the Year nominations now open

Niall Byrne niall at scienceinpublic.com
Mon May 16 14:15:52 EST 2005


From: Niall Byrne
Subject: Young Scientist of the Year nominations now open


Dear ASC,

The Australian and British Council Australia are looking for the Young Scientist of the Year for 2005. 

The winner will receive a trip to the UK and Ireland in September 2005, to the value of AUDS$5,000. The winner will also gain a unique insight into science reporting by working with The Australian, The Times, and London’s Science Museum. 

Entrants are asked to write an original news story about their research, not to exceed 550 words and in a style suitable for publication in The Australian.

If you know of anyone suitable, please pass this email on to them and encourage them to nominate.

Please note the award is intended for early career working scientists, it is not intended to for those planning a career in journalism or science communication.

Nominations close at 5pm Friday 10 June 2005.

More information on the award and how to enter is included below. For further details please go to the Science and Nation section at www.theaustralian.com.au or to www.britishcouncil.org.au.


Kind regards,


Niall Byrne

Science in Public for The Australian and British Council Australia. 
niall at scienceinpublic.com

____________________________ 


The winner of the Young Scientist of the Year Award will gain first-hand experience in newsrooms enabling them to communicate more effectively with journalists and the general public throughout their research career.

The winner will work as a journalist on The Australian and The Times in London as well as joining the Antenna science news team at London’s Science Museum. Armed with new journalistic skills, the winner will then cover the 2005 British Association Festival of Science in Dublin, Ireland, for The Australian and the British Council Australia’s website.

Last year’s winner, Christopher Watson, from the University of Tasmania, said that thanks to the award, he no longer felt like a “clay tablet” scribe. 

“I’ve learned to write quickly and clearly, an asset in any profession. I’ve definitely added some very sharp arrows to my professional quiver. What an experience,” he said.

The Australian editor-in-chief, Chris Mitchell, said science was fundamental to many of the most important news and feature stories the newspaper covers every day.

“Journalists and scientists speak different languages and I am proud that through this program we can contribute to a better understanding and a more informed conversation between science and society,” said Mr Mitchell.

“Last year we had over 90 entries, which shows that we are tapping into an enthusiastic market. We enjoyed having Christopher in the newsroom and he did a valiant job as a cadet reporter. It was a worthwhile experience for all of us.”

British Council Australia director, Simon Gammell, said: “This award is leading to better communication between science and the media and is also further encouraging intellectual and cultural dialogue between Australia and the UK.

“I was very impressed by the quality of applications last year and really pleased we found a winner who made such a good use of the unique opportunity the award provides. 

“Christopher Watson did us proud in the UK and we are looking for an equally impressive Young Scientist this time round.”

The Young Scientist of the Year Award is open to fully qualified scientists or engineers at the start of their career. It is not intended for those wishing to work in journalism or science communication.


How to enter.

The award offers the opportunity to win a trip to the UK and Ireland in September 2005, to the value of AUD$5,000. The winner will receive a maximum of two weeks media training at The Australian’s Sydney bureau, three days training at The Times in London and three days with the Antenna science news team at London’s Science Museum.
 
Entrants are asked to write an original news story about their research, not to exceed 550 words and in a style suitable for publication in The Australian. 

The entries will be assessed by a panel of judges selected by The Australian and British Council Australia. The judges will look for interesting research topics, scientific accuracy, clarity of expression and a lively news writing style.

The competition closes at 5pm Friday, 10 June 2005.

For further details and terms and conditions go to the Science and Nation section at www.theaustralian.com.au or to www.britishcouncil.org.au.


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