[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 5 AUGUST 2006

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Aug 2 01:40:33 CEST 2006


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE
 
MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE: 5 AUGUST 2006 (Vol. 191 No. 2563)
 
EMBARGO: THESE ITEMS BELOW ARE NOT TO BE USED FOR PUBLICATION OR
BROADCAST BEFORE: 04:00 HRS AEST THURSDAY 3 AUGUST 2006. 
  
NOT BRAIN-DEAD, BUT RIPE FOR TRANSPLANT
A drive to increase the number of available organs for transplant, by
changing the definition of death, has divided the medical world. Doctors
normally wait to confirm a patient is brain-dead, by which time organs
are often irreparably damaged. So most organs are transplanted from
patients with such severe brain injuries that brain-death can be
determined whilst the life-support is still on. However, in June, Canada
announced their first organ transplant from a patient who hadn't been
declared brain-dead but whose heart had stopped beating. A similar shift
to try and increase the pool of healthy organs and potential donors in
this way is taking place in the US and Australia. NEWS Pages 6-7
 
THE ANTIOXIDANT MYTH
Green tea, selenium, vitamin E, grape seed extract. All are antioxidants
and we've been swallowing them in our millions in the belief that they
mop up nasty free radicals and stave off disease. But evidence gathered
over the last few years has shown that not only are antioxidant
supplements strangely powerless at preventing oxidative damage, but they
have the potential to make things worse. So should we just stick to
fruit and vegetables? FEATURE Pages 40-43
 
PARADISE LOST
Climate change has now been recognised as a serious threat. But there's
another disaster in the making from our fossil fuel habit which
scientists have only just begun to research - ocean acidification. The
oceans are taking up so much carbon dioxide that the water chemistry is
changing. The affects it will have on marine life are uncertain, but
most likely to be threatened are corals and any sea creature with a
shell or skeleton. FEATURE Pages 29-33
 
BREAST IS BEST, BUT WATCH OUT FOR ALLERGIES
Breast milk has long been recognised as the most nutritious food for
babies, but can they have too much of a good thing? Researchers in
Finland have been monitoring newborns from 200 women for the past twenty
years. They found that exclusive breastfeeding for nine months or more
actually appeared to increase the chances of a baby developing
allergies. NEWS Page 14
 
THE MAN WHO WAS BOTH ALIVE AND DEAD
The mysterious disappearance of celebrated Italian physicist Ettore
Majorana in the 1930s may have been engineered by himself to create an
illusion of being both dead and alive at the same time. Bizarre letters
sent by Majorana suggest he used his disappearance to demonstrate the
paradox of quantum superposition - where a particle can simultaneously
exist in two mutually exclusive quantum states. NEWS Page 15
 
THE SECRET LIFE OF SEMEN
Semen could have far bigger role to play in reproduction than just
acting as the primary carrier for sperm. According to an American
researcher, seminal fluid from fertile men contains a host of hormones,
some of which, such as follicle stimulating hormone, are known to induce
ovulation. Others have a role in maintaining pregnancy. The researcher
told New Scientist: "IVF clinics should consider not rinsing away the
semen from sperm". NEWS Page 8
  
WHY DRINKING BEER IS GOOD FOR THE PLANET
Here's another good reason to drink beer: Beer bran, the by-product of
brewing beer from barley, can be used to remove pollutants from water.
Researchers in Japan have demonstrated that the bran adsorbs hazardous
organic compounds from industrial wastewater. NEWS Page 26
 
LET'S GO FOR A BRAIN BOOSTER
According to researchers in Singapore, eating curry seems to boost brain
power in elderly people. Curcumin, a constituent of turmeric, is
reported to inhibit the build-up of amyloid plaques in people with
Alzheimer's. What's more you only need to consume a curry once in a
while for the effect to be noticed. SHORT NEWS STORY Page 18
 
DOWNTOWN UPROAR
Every now and then a new building will make loud, irritating screeches
when exposed to strong winds. But as buildings tower ever higher, the
whistling gets louder. It's the same principle as the noise you get when
blowing over the top of a beer bottle. But every building and offending
din or howl is unique and solving the problem involves first locating
the noisy part of the building - usually the louvres, wire meshing or
lattices at the top of the buildings. FEATURE Pages 34-36 
 
THE FOG CATCHER'S FOREST
Some time in the last century, one of the Canary Islands, Lanzarote,
became bone dry and bare of trees. Previous reforestation efforts have
failed because the moisture-rich mountain fog never reaches the ground.
But now a British forestry scientist has a plan to fill the island with
trees again. His scheme is to use large fog-collecting devices on the
mountains to catch any moisture and feed it onto fields to irrigate new
forests. The project started this summer and initial results look
promising. FEATURE Pages 37-39
 
DOES DRUG TESTING TELL THE WHOLE STORY?
Two prominent American athletes have failed drugs tests in the last
week. Floyd Landis, winner of the Tour de France, and Olympic 100-metre
champion Justin Gatlin. So are they guilty of cheating, or is there
another explanation? NEWS Page 8

- ENDS-
 
IF REPORTING ON ANY OF THE STORIES ABOVE, PLEASE CREDIT NEW SCIENTIST AS
THE SOURCE, AND IF REPORTING ONLINE, PLEASE INCLUDE A LINK TO:
www.newscientist.com
 
PRESS CONTACT IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND:
If you'd like to view the above articles in full-text AND/OR for radio &
TV interviews, please contact Kitty Timpson, Media Manager Australia,
Tel: +61 (0)2 9422 2893 or email: media at newscientist.com.au
 
PRESS CONTACT IN EUROPE: 
If you'd like to register for our Online Press Site, please contact
Claire Bowles, New Scientist Press Officer Europe, Tel: +44 (0)20 7611
1210 or email: claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk
 
PRESS CONTACT IN THE US:
New Scientist Boston: Tel: +1 617 558 4939 or email:
kyre.austin at newscientist.com
 
New Scientist is the world's leading science and technology news weekly,
boasting a global circulation of 163,724 (ABC UK July-Dec '05).

For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit
www.newscientist.com

Kitty Timpson
Media Manager - Australia
New Scientist 
Tel: +61 2 9422 2893




 
 
This e-mail is for the use of the intended recipient(s) only.  If you have
received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately and then
delete it.  If you are not the intended recipient, you must not use, disclose
or distribute this e-mail without the author's permission.  We have taken
precautions to minimise the risk of transmitting software viruses, but we
advise you to carry out your own virus checks on any attachment to this e-mail.
We cannot accept liability for any loss or damage caused by software viruses.


More information about the ASC-media mailing list