[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE - 9TH DECEMBER 2006

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Dec 6 00:04:09 CET 2006


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE - 9 DECEMBER 2006


THIS WEEK'S MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE:  9 DECEMBER 2006 (Vol. 192 No. 2581)

EMBARGO: THESE STORIES BELOW ARE NOT TO BE USED FOR PUBLICATION OR
BROADCAST BEFORE:- 
05:00 HRS GMT THURS 7 DECEMBER 2006. 


IN THE MAGAZINE THIS WEEK:

 

MALES WITH A VERSION OF THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE

Male shrimp undergo a menstrual-like cycle of reproductive readiness and
renewal, in which they discard their old, tired sperm and replace them
with a fresh lot. It is the first time males have been found to refresh
sperm just as females refresh eggs. Researchers in Israel inferred from
their study that male shrimp re-absorb their old spermatophores just
before moulting. Page 16

 

NOSE MODEL GETS A CAUTIOUS SNIFF

A controversial theory proposed a decade ago that smell receptors in the
nose respond to the vibration of molecules, rather than their size and
shape, has been revitalised. Researchers at University College London
have modelled how nose receptors respond to different smelly molecules.
When a molecule docks with a receptor it stimulates an electron to jump
across the molecule, causing a vibration of its atoms. The researchers
believe that when the electron pings across the molecule a signal is
sent to the brain. Page 12

 

AVOID AIRBAG INJURIES, KEEP KIDS IN THE BACK

Airbags have been hugely successful in preventing deaths and injuries in
car crashes, but they are designed for adults. A new study from
Philadelphia is the first to show that children sitting in the front
seat of a car are more likely to suffer from tinnitus and breathing
problems, if an airbag goes off, than a child sitting in the back. Page
21

 

INVENTED FOR THE MILITARY, USED TO DEFEND WILDLIFE

Seismic sensors developed for the battlefield are being adapted by
conservationists to fight back against illegal poachers and loggers in
Africa. Seismic detectors are being buried along forest footpaths to
pick up the footfalls of hunters, while eavesdropping sensors are being
hidden in trees to listen out for elephant calls as well as gunshots.
Data is also being borrowed from environmental monitoring satellites to
reveal any illegal logging that can devastate the animals' habitat.
Pages 30-31

 

'USE PHONE CELLS AS TOLL GATES'

The UK government was told by a transport committee last week that a
road charging scheme is the only way to reduce congestion and greenhouse
gas emissions. Transport researchers in Taiwan have come up with a way
to avoid the huge expense of installing roadside toll booths and
antennas. They suggest a solution would be to take advantage of our
existing cellphone networks to manage a road charging scheme. When a
cellphone user's car crosses to another toll zone, software would
automatically bill the car driver. Page 29

 

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New Scientist 

Tel: +61 2 9422 2893

 

 

 


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