[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE - 11TH NOVEMBER 2006

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Tue Nov 7 23:59:25 CET 2006


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE - 11TH NOVEMBER 2006
 
COMING NEXT WEEK:

New Scientist's 50th Anniversary issue.
"So after 50 years, what do we know about the world around us?" 45-pages
of essential views from the world's best scientific minds.
 

THIS WEEK'S MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE:  11 NOVEMBER 2006 (Vol. 192 No. 2577)
 
EMBARGO: THESE STORIES BELOW ARE NOT TO BE USED FOR PUBLICATION OR
BROADCAST BEFORE:- 
06:00 HRS AEST THURS 9 NOVEMBER 2006. 
 
NEWS:
 
INVESTIGATIVE REPORT - HOME-SCHOOLING
Christian home-schooling is part of a large well-organised movement in
the US that is empowering parents to teach their children creationist
biology with the Bible as the ultimate science reference book. New
Scientist investigates how home-schooling with its considerable legal
support is changing the face of science education in the US, emptying
public schools, and shaping the next generation of conservative leaders.
Pages 20-23 
 
THE POOR WILL PAY FOR GLOBAL WARMING
The key message being pushed by hundreds of delegates and academics at
an international meeting on climate change which opened this week in
Nairobi, Kenya, is that climate change should be seen as a human rights
issue. A major report released on the ethical dimension of climate
change suggests that human rights should come before economics in
deciding how to respond to climate change, and that poor and vulnerable
people harmed by the effects of global warming have a right to
compensation. Pages 8-9
 
ARE UTERUS TRANSPLANTS ON THE HORIZON?
Following the success of the first uterus transplant into a non-human
primate in the US last month, the New York Downtown Hospital has given
approval for a human transplant and is interviewing women as potential
recipients for a donated uterus. But would it be safe? Other researchers
would like to know what happens when you try to get a primate pregnant
using a transplanted uterus before trying it in a human being. Page 12
 
TAKE A LEAF OUT OF NATURE'S BOOK TO TAP SOLAR POWER
We barely even begin to exploit the full potential of the sun's energy,
with solar cells typically converting only 17 per cent of the energy
falling on them into electricity. But nature has already designed a more
efficient light-capturing technology right under our noses: in plants.
Scientists hope to create artificial versions of the pigment structure
plants use to significantly improve on the solar absorption of existing
solar cells. Pages 30-31
 
 
FEATURES:
 
THE NEANDER CODE
Neanderthal fossils and tools still leave a whole range of questions
unanswered about our evolutionary history. Just how "human" were our
ancestors? And why did they die out while modern humans conquered the
globe? This year, German scientists announced audacious plans to
reconstruct the entire genome of the Neanderthals - the first time any
extinct organism will have been sequenced. If they pull it off, not only
will it help us understand more about Neanderthals, but it will tell us
what it is that makes us specifically human. Pages 44-47
 
BUYER BEWARE
When you spend more money on superior-quality food, are you sure you're
getting what you paid for? Food fraud is big business, cheating shoppers
out of hundreds of millions of pounds every year. With no sure way for
consumers to check, scientists are now devising some sophisticated
techniques to track and authenticate food from farm to fork. Pages 40-43
 
BODY OF EVIDENCE
It's no secret that doctors make mistakes. It has been estimated that as
many as 1 in 20 patients who die in hospital, do so because their
illness was misdiagnosed. Yet shockingly, despite being the best way to
help learn from whatever it was that led to an error, hospital autopsies
are in steep decline in most countries. Pages 48-51
 
AXIS OF UPHEAVAL
A lab in Austria has succeeded in detecting an elusive phenomenon called
gravitomagnetism. But the force that the team witnessed is trillions of
times stronger than anyone - even Einstein - expected. Pages 36-39
 
-- ENDS--
 
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PRESS CONTACT IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND:
If you'd like to view the above articles in full-text AND/OR for radio &
TV interviews, please contact Kitty Timpson, Media Manager Australia,
Tel: +61 (0)2 9422 2893 or email: media at newscientist.com.au
 
PRESS CONTACT IN EUROPE: 
If you'd like to register for our Online Press Site, please contact
Claire Bowles, New Scientist Press Officer Europe, Tel: +44 (0)20 7611
1210 or email: claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk
 
PRESS CONTACT IN THE US:
New Scientist Boston: Tel: +1 617 558 4939 or email:
kyre.austin at newscientist.com
 

New Scientist is the world's leading science and technology news weekly,
boasting a global circulation of 170,541 (ABC UK Jan - June '06).

For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit
www.newscientist.com

Kitty Timpson
Media Manager - Australia
New Scientist 
Tel: +61 2 9422 2893

 
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