[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 16 SEPTEMBER

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Sep 13 00:16:00 CEST 2006


 
NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE

 
MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE: 16 SEPTEMBER 2006 (Vol. 191 No. 2569)

EMBARGO: THESE ITEMS BELOW ARE NOT TO BE USED FOR PUBLICATION OR
BROADCAST BEFORE:- 04:00 HRS AEST THURSDAY 14 SEPTEMBER 2006. 



NEW SCIENTIST'S GUIDE TO LIVING ONLINE:


For millions of people, especially the under-25s, online culture is the
only culture that matters. Older adults go online to find information,
but the younger crowd are going online to live. But what's the culture
all about and where will it end up? Welcome to the MySpace generation.
 

*	THIS IS YOUR SPACE 

How did the phenomenon of social networking websites evolve, and how do
they work? With people spending so much time communicating online, does
this change the way people socialise and work? Pages 46-48 

*	I'LL HAVE TO ASK MY FRIENDS 

Sociologist Sherry Turkle is concerned that all this instant messaging,
emailing and online social networking is transforming human psychology.
Pages 48-49

*	THINGS YOU WOULDN'T TELL YOUR MOTHER 

Revealing your sexual habits to your closest friend is one thing, but
millions of people are now sharing this kind of information with total
strangers on social networking sites. Is this the end of privacy as we
know it? And will their openness come back to bite them when they go for
job interviews? Pages 50-51

 
OTHER FEATURES:
 

THE OUTSIDER

It's a dilemma faced by many anthropologists: if the lives of the human
subjects you are studying are at risk, should you intervene and risk
"altering the data" or merely record what you observe? Rachel Burr was
faced with such a problem whilst studying Vietnamese children in a
"reform school". The experience not only changed the direction of her
research, but led her to question the ethics surrounding her profession.
Pages 37-39

 

HOW TO BE A GENIUS

Forget the notion that genius is an innate gift or talent that you're
born with. If you want to achieve extraordinary things, you'll need a
mixture of natural ability, good instruction and support, but most
importantly the willingness to put in a huge amount of investment and
effort. 

Studies of high achievers in fields like science, sport and music all
dispel the myth of inherent genius. 

Pages 40-43



SAVED BY THE SUN

A growing number of scientists believe there are clear links between the
sun's activity and the Earth's temperature. Historically, a calm sun
with few sunspots has coincided with mini ice ages. Now, some
astronomers are predicting that the sun is about to enter another quiet
period of activity - could this be our last chance to tackle global
warming? Pages 32-36

 

NEWS:


MEGA-DAMS BACK ON THE AGENDA

The World Bank is "back to business as usual", funding new large dams,
especially in Africa. This marks an end to the ceasefire between the
World Bank and conservationists, while they worked on a report together.
A leading ecologist told a meeting in Brisbane last week that this new
policy could drive large parts of the world into poverty with large dams
threatening to damage the fisheries and wetlands on which the poorest
people depend. Page 10

 

SOLAR ALCHEMY TURNS FUMES BACK TO FUELS

Chemists are hoping to convert carbon dioxide - the biggest contributer
to climate change - back into a useful fuel with help from the sun. The
researchers in Italy have developed an electro-catalytic technique to
reduce carbon dioxide back to hydrocarbons which can then be made into
petrol and diesel. If successful, the work could be used to recycle the
greenhouse gas produced by burning fossil fuels. Page 30

 

LESS LETHAL, BUT STILL NOT SAFE

The Pentagon's less-lethal microwave-based crowd control weapon has
flaws in hot conditions, questioning its usefulness in places like Iraq.
The Active Denial System (ADS) fires a microwave beam which forces a
victim to move away, without causing harm. But tests of the weapon
showed that its effect can be intensified by reflections off buildings
and water, and sweaty skin. Page 27

 

GREEN GOODS BAD?

Can eco-friendly products and services actually be bad for the
environment? An economic model suggests that perhaps, when consumers buy
premium green goods, they are less willing to donate directly to an
environmental cause, possibly lowering the overall contribution. Page 5

 

- ENDS-

 

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For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit
www.newscientist.com <http://www.newscientist.com/> 

 

Simone Colless

New Scientist 

Tel: +61 2 9422 2737

 

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