[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 29 SEPTEMBER 2007

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Sep 26 01:38:31 CEST 2007


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 29 SEPTEMBER 2007

MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE:  29 SEPTEMBER 2007 (Vol. 195 No's 2623)

EMBARGO: 
THESE STORIES BELOW ARE NOT TO BE USED FOR PUBLICATION OR BROADCAST
BEFORE:- 03:00 HRS AEST THU 27 SEPTEMBER 2007. 

These articles below are distributed in advance of publication to those
authorised media who may wish to quote extracts as part of fair dealing
with this copyrighted material.  If reporting on any of the stories
below please credit New Scientist Magazine. 
 
SUPERBUGS BITE BACK 
You don't have to be in a hospital to pick up killer superbugs like
MRSA. A frightening range of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are now
lurking just about everywhere - in our homes, schools, and local gyms.
And it comes at a time when drug companies are investing less in
developing new antibiotics. Experts warn that we need a strategy to
contain these superbugs at the community level before these bacteria
start to make us defenceless to common ailments like pneumonia. FEATURE
Pages 37-39
http://media.newscientist.com/data/pdf/press/2623/262337.pdf (Graphics
available)
 
A HARMLESS SHOCK - IF YOU'RE HEALTHY
Recent footage of a University of Florida student being 'tased' by
police, together with wider marketing by Taser, has renewed debate over
the appropriate use of the Taser stun gun and whether it is safe to use
them. Although cases of wrongful injury or death from a Taser have never
been won, critics point to a lack of studies in humans. But now health
concerns are beginning to be addressed. Results from two trials on
volunteers are emerging where physiological measurements were taken
before, during and after tasering. Neither study showed any adverse
effects. Critics still argue that studies on healthy volunteers do not
reflect how someone will react under the stress of police custody. Pages
6-7
http://media.newscientist.com/data/pdf/press/2623/262306.pdf
 
'RE-PLUMBING' LIVER HELPS BEAT CANCER
A procedure that temporarily diverts blood leaving the liver during
chemotherapy could prolong the lives of people with primary or secondary
tumours. The blood supply leaving the liver is blocked using balloons,
meaning the concentration of the chemotherapy drug working on the tumour
is hundreds of times greater than normal - increasing the chances of
tumours being killed. Blood does still leave the liver via the balloons,
but instead of carrying on to the heart as usual it is diverted out of
the body, and filtered to remove the drug before returning to the body.
Page 8
http://media.newscientist.com/data/pdf/press/2623/262308.pdf (Graphics
available)
 
A LITTLE FLIRTING GOES A LONG WAY
Why do women fall for bastards? It seems men can mask their antisocial
behaviour by a bit of flirting - and women fall for it. Researchers from
the UK found that when men used animated facial expressions - such as
smiling, eyebrow raising and nodding - women paid more attention to
their flirting than they did to their antisocial comments or behaviour -
but only where the women were interested in a short-term relationship.
Page 10
http://media.newscientist.com/data/pdf/press/2623/262310.pdf (Graphics
available)
 
THE GREAT ESCAPE
Periods can be a pain - they can cause headaches, bloating, cramps and
mood swings - so why have them at all? Now women can choose to opt out
with a new oral contraceptive designed for women "interested in putting
their periods on hold" and taken every day of the year. The new pills
which keep periods at bay by blocking the body's own progesterone have
sparked a debate. Some say uninterrupted monthly periods aren't
necessary and could even be bad for woman's health. While others say
long-term exposure to hormones in birth control pills could be harmful.
FEATURE Pages 40-43
http://media.newscientist.com/data/pdf/press/2623/262340.pdf (Graphics
available)
 
DON'T OVERDO IT
According to a study of pregnant women in Denmark, avoiding strenuous
exercise in early pregnancy may reduce the risk of miscarriage.
High-impact sports such as jogging and racket sports carried the
greatest risk, while swimming did not raise the risk at all. SHORT STORY
Page 16
http://media.newscientist.com/data/pdf/press/2623/262316.pdf
 
CANCER DRUG IS GO
A promising but controversial anti-cancer treatment that attracted
massive public interest earlier this year is to be tested on 50 people
with brain tumours. The same Canadian researchers who had promising
results from the drug, dichloroacetate, now have approval from Health
Canada to carry out an authorised trial. SHORT STORY Page 5
http://media.newscientist.com/data/pdf/press/2623/262305.pdf 

HOW A DRUG COMPANY HANDLES ITS CRITICS
When a researcher in the US raised safety concerns (and then later
withdrew them) about GlaxoSmithKline's (GSK) new diabetes drug Avandia
in 1999, discussions within GSK about how to treat their critic took
place at the highest levels. Email conversations emerged when the US
Congress examined the controversy over Avandia in June this year. Page
10
http://media.newscientist.com/data/pdf/press/2623/262310.pdf 

 
- ENDS -
 
 
IF REPORTING ON ANY OF THESE STORIES, PLEASE CREDIT NEW SCIENTIST AS THE
SOURCE, AND IF REPORTING ONLINE, PLEASE INCLUDE A LINK TO:
www.newscientist.com.
 
 NOTES TO EDITOR:
*	New Scientist magazine is the world's leading science and
technology news weekly, boasting a worldwide circulation of over 175,000
(ABC Audit March 2007). 
 
*	The magazine is complimented by NewScientist.com, your ultimate
science and technology website. It includes breaking news updated
throughout the day by our global network of specialist correspondents
providing comprehensive coverage of science and technology news. 
 
*	New Scientist offers a syndication service. The rights to all
stories in the magazine and on our website are owned by our publishers
Reed Business Information. If you are interested in reproducing any of
the full-text articles or graphics you see in the pdfs above, please
email your details and the article in question to:
claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk. We take any breach of our copyright very
seriously.


PRESS CONTACT IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND:
If you'd like to view the above articles in full-text AND/OR for radio &
TV interviews, please contact Nicole Scott, Marketing and PR Coordinator
-  Australia, Tel: 61 2 9422 2893 or email: media at newscientist.com.au
 
PRESS CONTACT IN EUROPE: 
If you'd like to register for our Online Press Site, please contact
Claire Bowles, New Scientist Press Officer Europe, Tel: +44 (0)20 7611
1210 or email: claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk
 
PRESS CONTACT IN THE US:
New Scientist Boston: Tel: +1 617 558 4939 or email:
kyre.austin at newscientist.com
 

For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit
www.newscientist.com

Nicole Scott
Marketing and PR Coordinator - Australia
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2893
Email: media at newscientist.com.au

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