[ASC-media] Dangerous climate at peak science showcase

Sharon Abrahams sharon.abrahams at science.org.au
Fri Apr 18 01:21:55 CEST 2008


 

 

 

Dangerous climate at peak science showcase

 

Rising sea levels, drought and rainfall will all be experienced in
Canberra in the first week of May when 'Dangerous climate change' is
featured at the Academy of Science's peak annual event, Science at the
Shine Dome.

 

The three-day celebration of science attracts over 300 delegates to
Canberra, and brings to the spotlight the great research achievements of
some of Australia's brightest scientists.

 

This year's symposium will showcase the latest Australian research on
climate change, and the potential hazards that lie ahead for humanity
and the planet. A feature of the symposium will be Dr Neil Hamilton from
the WWF's International Arctic Programme, discussing the effects of
climate change in the Arctic and whether dangerous climate change is
already upon us.

 

Also for discussion:

 

*	Can we avoid dangerous climate change? - Dr Graeme Pearman AM
FAA FRSD FTSE 
*	Economic perspectives on climate change - Ms Anthea Harris 
*	Predicting global sea levels - Dr John Church FTSE 
*	The challenge to Australia - Mr Roger Beale AO 
*	Can coral reefs adapt? - Prof Ove Hoegh-Guldberg FAA 
*	The vulnerability of socio-ecological systems - Prof Amanda
Lynch 
*	A new geological epoch, the Anthropocene - Prof Will Steffen 

 

Science at the Shine Dome is packed with new science on other topics. It
kicks off on Wednesday 7 May with Macfarlane Burnet Medal winner
Professor Rick Shine presenting a lecture on the battle against cane
toads in tropical Australia. 

 

As the spread of cane toads continues, Professor Shine and his team have
revealed 'remarkably rapid adaptive shifts both in the toads and in
their Australian victims'.  He will outline the interaction between cane
toads, their parasites, and native animals and how understanding the
evolution of this relationship over time provides new approaches to help
control them.

 

The cutting edge research continues with new Fellows of the Academy
presenting their work on a variety of topics. These include: 

 

*	Controlling killer T cells, the assassins of the immune system 
*	Koalas, eucalypts and climate change 
*	The accelerating universe 
*	New ways of finding genes for common diseases 
*	Plant adaptation to increased CO2 levels 
*	Understanding birth defects through mouse development 
*	Boys, girls and children of uncertain sex: the genetics and
biology of sex development 
*	The composition of the Earth - are our assumptions correct? 
*	New developments in quantum computing 

 

Commenting on the scope of the program, Academy President Professor Kurt
Lambeck said: 'Science at the Shine Dome features admission of new
Fellows to the Academy - the pinnacle of achievement for Australian
scientists - as well as the presentation of some of science's most
prestigious awards, including the Macfarlane Burnet, Pawsey and
Gottschalk Medals. The program also includes special career-development
programs for young researchers and science teachers.'

 

For more information on the event, new Fellows and their talks go to: 
www.science.org.au/sats2008 

 

Award winners can be found at: www.science.org.au/awards/2008awards 

 

Date:                           7-9 May 2007

Venue:                       The Shine Dome, Gordon Street, Canberra

Media contact:          Richard Bray: 02 6201 9452 or 0416 331 821 

richard.bray at science.org.au

 

Media are welcome and interviews can be arranged through the media
contact.

 

A professional photographer will be covering the event if you need
images.

 

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