[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 19 JANUARY 2008

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Tue Jan 15 22:25:19 CET 2008


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 19 JANUARY 2008

MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE:  19 JANUARY 2008 (Vol. 197 No. 2639)

EMBARGO: 
THESE STORIES BELOW ARE NOT TO BE USED FOR PUBLICATION OR BROADCAST
BEFORE:- 05:00 HRS AEDT THU 17 JANUARY 2008. 

All FULL-TEXT articles together with artwork, photos and graphics shown
on the PDFs below are not to be reproduced without prior permission from
New Scientist. The articles are distributed in advance of publication to
those authorised media who may wish to report on our stories, quoting
extracts as part of fair dealing with this copyrighted material.  Please
remember to credit New Scientist Magazine - thank you.

LONGER LEGS STAND OUT FROM THE CROWD
Legs come in all shapes and sizes but it seems the stereotype of long
legs being more desirable really does hold true.  New Scientist reports
on research at the University of Wroclaw in Poland that found legs that
were 5 per cent longer than average were considered the most attractive.
It is thought that long legs may be signalling good heath to the
admirer.  Short Story, Page 16
http://media.newscientist.com/data/pdf/press/2639/263916.pdf (Graphics
available)

A Wii WARM-UP HONES BUDDING SURGICAL SKILLS
You might think it a bad idea for trainee surgeons to play games on the
Nintendo Wii when they should be studying, but it might be time well
spent.  New Scientist reports that researchers at the Banner Good
Samaritan Medical Center, Arizona, have found that surgical residents
performed better during simulated surgery after playing on a Wii
console.  Some games, such as Marble Mania - in which the player guides
a marble through a 3D obstacle course - are especially good because
players must use small precise movements. Page 24
http://media.newscientist.com/data/pdf/press/2639/263924.pdf

BEASTLY TALES
Like spies in the halls of history, our animal and plant companions hold
lost secrets about our past.  Through their genes we can trace the paths
of ancient migrations and trade routes and they can even help
researchers glimpse the motives of ancient peoples as they laid the
cornerstones of civilisation.  New Scientist feature Beastly Tales
explains, for example, how the hedgehog gave the answer to the riddle of
where the ancient settlers on the Swedish Island of Gotland came from
and how the similarity between human pubic lice and gorilla lice could
give clues to the behaviour of early humans. Feature, Page 30-33
http://media.newscientist.com/data/pdf/press/2639/263930.pdf

WHAT WE REALLY WANT
Research that involves macaque monkeys looking at pay-per-view primate
porn may just help solve one to the central questions about how our
brains work.  New Scientist feature What we Really Want reports on
studies in which macaques were rewarded with different amounts of juice
to either look at, or not look at, images of other monkey's faces or
bottoms.  The studies might give clues about how we evaluate the options
we see and make informed choices about how to act.  Feature, Page 34-37
http://media.newscientist.com/data/pdf/press/2639/263934.pdf

REPTILE PERIL
Snake oil, tortoise blood and caiman fat are lubricating a slippery
slope towards extinction for many reptiles.  New Scientist reports on a
new study that shows folk healers around the world utilise at least 165
reptile species in their concoctions and 88 of them are already on the
endangered species list.  Short Story, Page 7
http://media.newscientist.com/data/pdf/press/2639/263907.pdf

GENDER BIAS
If you thought the glass ceiling had been shattered for female
scientists, think again.  New Scientist reports on findings that suggest
women are more likely to have their research published if the referees
who peer review their work are unaware of their gender. Short Story,
Page 7
http://media.newscientist.com/data/pdf/press/2639/263907.pdf

THEY KNOW THEY'RE BEING WATCHED
To protect their food, from would-be thieves, deceptive squirrels have
been observed putting on a great show of "hiding" non-existent nuts.
The number of times they carried out fake burials increased when they
knew they were being watched.  Short Story Page 16
http://media.newscientist.com/data/pdf/press/2639/263916.pdf

The following story is not available on the press site. For full text
articles please contact Nicole Scott at media at newscientist.com.au.

THE GREAT COAL HOLE
Coal, we are told, is practically limitless. Even at today's voracious
rate of consumption, we have well over a century before things get
tight. But new evidence is coming to light suggesting that, like oil,
coal supplies are already dwindling. Our insatiable appetite for coal is
partly to blame, with global coal consumption rising 35 per cent between
2000 and 2006. But there is also the suggestion that previous estimates
of coal supplies have been hugely inflated, as several coal-producing
nations dramatically reduce estimates of their reserves.  There is a
silver lining, however - this could put a natural limit on how much
carbon dioxide we can pump into the atmosphere. Pages 38-41

-	ENDS -

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 NOTES TO EDITOR:
*	New Scientist magazine is the world's leading science and
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(ABC Audit March 2007). 
 
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If you'd like to view the above articles in full-text AND/OR for radio &
TV interviews, please contact Nicole Scott, Marketing and PR Manager -
Australia, Tel: 61 2 9422 2893 or email: media at newscientist.com.au
 
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email: henry.gomm at rbi.co.uk
 
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For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit
www.newscientist.com

Nicole Scott
Marketing and PR Manager - Australia/NZ
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2893
Email: media at newscientist.com.au

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