[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE - ISSUE 5 JULY 2008

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Jul 2 01:33:51 CEST 2008


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE FOR MAGAZINE ISSUE:  5 JULY 2008 (Vol. 198
No. 2663)

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BEFORE:- 04:00 HRS AEST THU 3 JULY 2008. 

All FULL-TEXT articles together with artwork, photos and graphics are
not to be reproduced without prior permission from New Scientist. The
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media who may wish to report on our stories, quoting extracts as part of
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New Scientist Magazine - thank you.

TV BOOM MAY BOOST GREENHOUSE EFFECT
An industrial chemical used in soaring quantities due to escalating
demands for flat-screen TVs, could be making global warming worse. The
gas called nitrogen triflouride is 17,000 times as potent as carbon
dioxide, but is not covered by the Kyoto protocol. Ironically the gas
was introduced as an alternative to greenhouse gases but a prominent
atmospheric chemist warns this week that it could be having the opposite
effect. Page 10

DISGUST AVAILABLE IN THREE REVOLTING FLAVOURS
The emotion we call "disgust" actually encompasses three types of
revulsion, each with its own evolutionary history and pattern of brain
activity. Researchers in Florida asked male volunteers to imagine
different types of activity with their sister, designed to trigger
different types of disgust: a pathogen-related disgust, incest and
theft. They found that the three types of disgusting stimuli triggered
different but overlapping patterns of brain activity. Page 15

WHY 'FUN-SIZED' FOOD WON'T KEEP YOU SMALL SIZE
Small snack-packs designed to make you loose weight in fact make people
eat more. Results from a study in the Netherlands suggest that diet
packs make people drop their guard and eat more as they think that with
pre-portioned packs that they don't have to exercise any self-control.
Page 14

A PUSHY PLACENTA MADE YOU CLEVER
The deeper implantation of the human placenta in the wall of the womb
could explain why our brains got so massive. Researchers had already
concluded that deeper placental invasion allows the fetus to scavenge
extra maternal blood, leading to larger brains. But until now no one
knew how the chemistry of the placenta might have evolved to lead to
primate placentas to burrow into the womb. A new theory has been put
forward by researchers in the US which suggests more sugars on placental
hormones make the placenta more invasive. They found that humans have
the most sugars while in primitive monkeys it is not made at all. Page
12 (Graphics available)

EUROPE'S CLEANER AIR MAKES FOR HOTTER CLIMES
Europe's skies may have become brighter with less air pollution over the
last three decades, but unfortunately it has allowed more of the sun's
rays to pierce the atmosphere. According to researchers in Switzerland,
this has contributed to at least half the warming that has occurred
during that period. Short Story Page 16

YOUTHFUL NURSEMAIDS RESTORE MALE FERTILITY
Some forms of male infertility could be treated by turning the
developmental clock back on the cells in the testes responsible for
nurturing undeveloped sperm. A shortage of healthy Sertoli cells is
thought to be responsible for between 5 and 15 per cent of infertility
cases in men. Australian studies in hamsters and humans have found that
by suppressing the production of sex hormones, Sertoli cells reverted
back to their immature state, and then started dividing. The researchers
hope they can replenish failing Sertoli populations in infertile men.
Page 14

NATURE 2.0
With such rapid changes to ecosystems from climate change, it's no
longer possible for conservationists to preserve nature's historic or
natural state. Rather than trying to protect plants and animals from the
changes to their environments, conservationists need to start working
with changes by helping animals and plants adapt. Some conservations
groups are already doing this, but others are nervous about
'reassembling' ecosystems. FEATURE Pages 32-35 

TIDAL POWER WITH A TWIST
The technology behind a flawed cold-war submarine could be a crucial
step towards the production of cheap renewable energy. With its
electromagnetic engine, the ocean vessel Yamato 1 was supposed to
revolutionise propulsion for warships and submarines. All tests on
Yamato 1 were eventually abandoned, but now a Japanese scientist
believes the efforts were not a waste. He suggests using electromagnetic
generators anchored to the seabed to harness tidal power and generate
electricity. FEATURE Pages 40-43 (Graphics available)

ENDS
 
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