[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE - ISSUE 19 JULY 2008

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Jul 16 01:23:52 CEST 2008


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE FOR MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE:  19 JULY 2008 (Vol.
199 No. 2665)

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BEFORE:- 04:00 HRS AEST THU 17 JULY 2008. 

All FULL-TEXT articles together with artwork, photos and graphics are
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New Scientist Magazine - thank you.

WHO NEEDS COAL WHEN YOU CAN HAVE DEEP HEAT
By next January, a tiny town in South Australia could be powered with
electricity generated from heat mined from subterranean "hot rocks". The
town has been picked as a demonstration heat mining site because it sits
on the largest, hottest slab of non-volcanic rock in the world. If
successful, it raises the possibility of continuous, affordable, green
power anywhere on Earth. 
Pages 24-25 (Graphics available)

NOTHING FISHY ABOUT THESE ELDER STATESMEN
Older people don't smell so bad after all - at least not those in the
US. In 2001, a Japanese study concluded that certain skin chemicals were
responsible for an "unpleasant greasy smell" in the older population.
Now a new US study has found none of the foul-smelling chemicals
previously blamed for this "ageing smell" in older Americans. The
researchers say the difference in the two studies could be attributed to
the fishy Japanese diet. Page 11

HAS PLUTO SENT US A MESSAGE IN CERES?
Does Pluto have a lost cousin lurking in the inner solar system? The
dwarf planet Ceres may have been born in Pluto's neighbourhood, but
travelled billions of kilometres away to its current home in the
asteroid belt between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. According to a US
researcher, Ceres is too large and icy to be an asteroid, and ended up
in the asteroid belt as a refugee from an upheaval in the early solar
system. Page 10

SEX ON THE BRAIN
Men and women think and behave differently, but for the most part
neuroscientists believe that male and female brains are the same. But
imagine if there were not just one kind of human brain, but two. This is
the conclusion that research is pointing towards after revealing a
number of anatomical and circuitry differences between male and female
brains. Working out these differences could explain why some drugs work
well for one sex but have little effect on the other. FEATURE Pages
28-31 (Graphics available)

PRINT... AND BE SPAMMED
Online advertising is growing in popularity, but web surfers are
increasingly ignoring ads on webs pages. So, to grab back their
attention, advertisers have come up with a new strategy - to make sure
whenever someone prints out a web page, the ads always appear on the
printout. But does it work? Page 26

BRAIN'S RESPONSE TO BEING SPURNED IS AFFECTED BY RACE
Rejection and insults are easier to bear when it's about something
non-personal, such as race, according to psychologists. A US study
measuring the fMRI brain scans of black and white students, found that
when white subjects were rejected in a task it activated an area of the
brain associated with pain and mental conflict, while in black students
rejection activated a completely different area of the brain. Page 14

DILEMMA OF A WATERY GRAVE
UNESCO is getting close to passing an extensive plan to preserve and
protect the thousands of historical shipwrecks and underwater sites
around the world. Archaeologists hope the plan will protect our
underwater heritage from looting treasure hunters looking for trophies.
However, other experts worry that with a blanket ban on all commercial
marine archaeology may do more harm than good by excluding the few
organisations with money and expertise that can monitor the seas. An
ancient stone circle was recently discovered in Lake Michigan by
technologies used in the oil and gas industry and applied to marine
archaeology. Pages 8-9

CUT!
According to advocates of male circumcision, the procedure is one of the
most effective public health measures ever invented, while opponents
insist circumcision has no medical benefits and damages a man's sex
life. Now, with recent findings about the role circumcision can play in
preventing the transmission of HIV - the debate continues to rumble on.
FEATURE Pages 40-43 (Graphics available)

ENDS
 
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