[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE - ISSUE 2 AUG 2008

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Jul 30 01:39:32 CEST 2008


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE FOR MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE:  2 AUG 2008 (Vol.
199 No. 2667)

EMBARGO: 
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BEFORE:- 04:00 HRS AEST THU 31 JULY 2008.

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New Scientist Magazine - thank you.

THE IMMUNITY FIX
Vaccines are one of the most successful inventions in medical history.
Could the next generation of vaccines be used to treat everything from
drug addiction and smoking to obesity and high blood pressure?  Recent
studies have shown that a vaccine against crack cocaine can make a user
immune to its effect. Could a vaccine targeting a hunger hormone help
obese people fight the flab?  FEATURE Page 42-45

DO WHEELCHAIRS HINDER RECOVERY?
Injured rats strapped to tiny "wheelchairs" that restrict their
movements recovered less limb function and coordination than those left
to fend for themselves. This might mean that people with a spinal cord
injury would recover better if they were encouraged to use their limbs
sooner after injury and relied less on wheelchairs.  Page 12

OLYMPICS SPECIAL:

EXPOSING THE ROOTS OF THE URGE TO CHEAT 
Finding out why some athletes resort to drugs while others stay clean
may be the key to deterring doping.
WILL "GENE DOPING" DEBUT IN BEIJING?
Although illegal, "gene-doping" is attractive because it prompts the
body to make hormones that are indistinguishable from the ones produced
naturally. That makes cheats harder to spot.  But will Beijing be
gene-doping's debut? SPECIAL REPORT Page 8-9 (Graphics available)

LET THEM EAT SPUDS
As the food crisis bites, the humble potato is poised to take over the
world. Developing countries now grow and eat more of them than the
traditional potato-eaters of the rich countries.  Yet behind this
success story lies a problem. The blight that wiped out Ireland's potato
crop in the 1840s is becoming increasingly resistant to the fungicides
used to control it. Without a new weapon against it, we could be setting
ourselves up for a replay of the famine wherever the disease strikes.
And this time even more people could suffer.  FEATURE Page 30-33
(Graphics available)

STORM WARNING 
Unusually early tornadoes have wreaked havoc in the US this year killing
dozen across several states.  In the face of such extreme weather, many
are wondering what part global warming might have to play.  New
Scientist looks beyond the spin for answers. FEATURE page 38-41
(Graphics available)

OH DEAR, WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH ANTIMATTER? 
Fire antimatter at matter and you would expect to see some spectacular
fireworks. But not always, it seems. Sometimes, antimatter can bounce
off matter, casting doubt on the long-held notion that a collision
between matter and antimatter always makes for an explosive
annihilation. Page 15

THIS STORY IS NOT UNDER EMBARGO:

GENE VARIANT MORE PREVALENT IN TRANSSEXUALS 
A Gene variant has been identified that appears to be associated with
female-to-male transsexuality - the feeling some women have that they
belong to the opposite sex. While such complex behaviour is likely the
result of multiple genes, environmental and cultural factors, the
researchers say the discovery suggests that transsexuality does have a
genetic component. Page 14

ENDS
 
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Nicole Scott
Marketing and PR Manager - Australia/NZ
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2893
Email: media at newscientist.com.au
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