[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE - ISSUE 6 SEPTEMBER 2008

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Sep 3 01:45:43 CEST 2008


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE FOR MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE:  6 SEPTEMBER 2008
(Vol. 199 No. 2672)

EMBARGO: 
THESE STORIES BELOW ARE NOT TO BE USED FOR PUBLICATION OR BROADCAST
BEFORE:- 04:00 HRS AEST THU 4 SEPTEMBER 2008. 

All FULL-TEXT articles together with artwork, photos and graphics are
not to be reproduced without prior permission from New Scientist. The
articles are distributed in advance of publication to those authorised
media who may wish to report on our stories, quoting extracts as part of
fair dealing with this copyrighted material.  Please remember to credit
New Scientist Magazine and link to www.newscientist.com if reporting
online - Thank you.

HOW WAR DEBRIS COULD CAUSE CANCER
If depleted uranium from spent munitions is making people exposed to it
ill, no one had any idea how, until now. The controversial claim of two
researchers could explain how residues of depleted uranium scattered
across former war zones is increasing the risk of genetic damage, and
cancer. The researchers claim that the uranium atoms in the body act as
"radiation antennas", by capturing photons of gamma radiation and
re-emitting their energy as photoelectrons - which are damaging to the
surrounding tissue.  Pages 8-9

3D MODELS TAKE THE GUESSWORK OUT OF BRAIN SURGERY
A new 3D imaging system showing blood flow patterns aims to give
surgeons a real-time picture of veins and arteries - and their problems
- immediately prior to surgery. The system called "Grid-enables
neurosurgical imaging simulation", or Genius, was developed by teams in
the UK, and will help surgeons dealing with problems such as aneurysms
and atherosclerosis to take fewer gambles. The system is expected to be
part of the world's first brain procedure guided by a real-time computer
simulation within a year. Pages 28-29 (Graphics available)

BETRAYED BY YOUR SHADOW?
Analysing the movement of human shadows in satellite video footage,
could help spot terrorists. According to US engineers, it should be
possible to identify people from space by looking at their shadows using
a technique called gait analysis - which measures a person's walking
style. Page 27

DID ROMANS DESTROY EUROPE'S HIV SHIELD?
It appears that the Roman Empire left a legacy that may still affect
modern Europe - those living in its conquered lands are more susceptible
to HIV. French researchers have found that the change in frequency of a
gene variant that gives some resistance to HIV reflects the changing
boundary of the Roman Empire from 500 BC and AD 500. By looking at DNA
samples across Europe, the team found the protective gene variant
dwindled in regions conquered by the Romans. Page 10 (Graphics
available)

SNAP-HAPPY DIETERS REAP BENEFITS
Watching what you eat - through a camera lens - could help dieters lose
weight. Researchers in the US compared the effect of written food
diaries with taking a snapshot of each meal. When they quizzed the
volunteers, photo diaries seemed to be the most effective, by triggering
them to think more about what they were about to eat. Short Story Page
21

WOMEN UNSETTLED BY AMBIGUOUS SEXIST SIGNALS
Women are more unnerved by not knowing a man's views than by overt
sexism, according to a US study. Results showed that female students who
were found to be sensitive to sexism scored worse in an exam if they
didn't know the examiner's view of women. They were not fazed however if
they thought their examiner was a chauvinist, and actually scored better
in the test than their non-sensitive peers. Short Story Page 21

HOW BEETLES ARE EVOLVING TO TAKE OVER THE PLANET
The startling speed with which the same species of beetles evolve
different penis sizes could mean they are evolving into new species
within a few years rather than millennia. US researchers studying male
horned beetles in four different countries found startling differences
in genital size among the four populations. Because beetles with
genitals of different sizes can't mate, researchers think the four
populations may soon split into distinct species. Page 14 (Graphics
available)

COLD COMFORT
Having a cold is a nuisance, but not dangerous, right? Not always.
Sometimes it can kill. In 2007, 140 people in the US were killed by a
family of viruses that normally causes no more than a common cold. We
are surprisingly ignorant about the viruses that cause the world's most
common disease. But interest in cold viruses has now been revived thanks
to new technologies, and scientists are turning up cold viruses that are
completely new to science. We ignore them at our peril. FEATURE Pages
44-47 (Graphics available)

THE CLIMATE CHANGES
Did Stone Age farmers kick-off global warming? It may be hard to
believe, but this is the view of a retired climatologist who believes
that ancient farmers were pumping carbon dioxide and methane into the
atmosphere long before recorded history began. Could the effect of early
farmers raising levels of greenhouse gases have been significant enough
to avert an ice age? FEATURE Pages 32-36 (Graphics available)

ENDS
 
IF REPORTING ON ANY OF THESE STORIES, PLEASE CREDIT NEW SCIENTIST AS THE
SOURCE, AND IF REPORTING ONLINE, PLEASE INCLUDE A LINK TO:
www.newscientist.com. 

PLEASE DO NOT REPRODUCE FULL ARTICLES OR GRAPHICS WITHOUT PRIOR
PERMISSION.

 NOTES TO EDITOR:
*	New Scientist magazine is the world's leading science and
technology news weekly, boasting a worldwide circulation of over 175,000
(ABC Audit March 2007). 
 
*	The magazine is complemented by NewScientist.com, your ultimate
science and technology website. It includes breaking news updated
throughout the day by our global network of specialist correspondents
providing comprehensive coverage of science and technology news. 
 
*	New Scientist offers a syndication service. The rights to all
stories in the magazine and on our website are owned by our publishers
Reed Business Information. If you are interested in reproducing any of
the full-text articles or graphics you see in the pdfs above, please
email your details and the article in question to:
claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk. We take any breach of our copyright very
seriously.


PRESS CONTACT IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND:
If you'd like to view the above articles in full-text AND/OR for radio &
TV interviews, please contact Nicole Scott, Marketing and PR Manager -
Australia, Tel: 61 2 9422 2893 or email: media at newscientist.com.au
 
PRESS CONTACT IN EUROPE: 
Claire Bowles, New Scientist Press Office, Tel: +44 (0)20 7611 1206 or
email: claire.bowles at rbi.co.uk
 
PRESS CONTACT IN THE US:
New Scientist Boston office: Tel: +1 617 386 2190 or email:
j.heselton at elsevier.com
 

For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit
www.newscientist.com

Nicole Scott
Marketing and PR Manager - Australia/NZ
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2893
Email: media at newscientist.com.au

This e-mail is for the use of the intended recipient(s) only.  If you have
received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately and then
delete it.  If you are not the intended recipient, you must not use, disclose
or distribute this e-mail without the author's permission.  We have taken
precautions to minimise the risk of transmitting software viruses, but we
advise you to carry out your own virus checks on any attachment to this e-mail.
We cannot accept liability for any loss or damage caused by software viruses.


More information about the ASC-media mailing list