[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 4 JULY 2009

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Jul 1 03:43:16 CEST 2009


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 4 JULY 2009 (Vol. 202 No. 2715)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 03:00 HRS AEST (05:00 HRS NZST) THURS 2 JULY 2009. 

All FULL-TEXT articles together with artwork, photos and graphics are not to be downloaded and reproduced without prior permission from New Scientist. The articles are distributed in advance of publication to those authorised media who may wish to report on our stories, quoting extracts as part of fair dealing with this copyrighted material.

Reports on this story must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com 

For full text versions of the articles below, please email media at newscientist.com.au or 
call +61 (0)2 9422 2556.


RISING SEA LEVELS
New Scientist looks at the biggest contributors to the rising sea levels in the past century. How high will our sea levels rise? How soon? And finally, what do rising sea levels mean for the future of mankind? (Feature) Pages 26-31

IS THERE AN END TO WAR?
The first solid evidence of violence occurring between individuals was estimated to be 14,000 years ago. Recent research and studies by scientists have found that many of us believe war to be inevitable and ongoing. Anthropologists look at whether or not warfare is a product of our genetic makeup or simply a response to a changing lifestyle. (Feature) Pages 36-39 

MEMRISTOR MINDS
Based on the ideas of electronics engineer, Lea Chua, the memristor was brought to life by Stan Williams at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, California and is now one of the hottest properties in physics. An electronic device capable of mimicking aspects of human intelligence, the memristor is able to translate information, memorise patterns and has the powerful potential to replace flash memory used in digital cameras and USB memory sticks. (Feature) Pages 40-43

EMOTION DETECTORS
Ever thought a technological device could hack into your emotions? Innerscope Research in Boston, Massachusetts is leading the way into an era of emotionally sensitive gadgets. New devices are being developed to detect a person's emotion by their posture and facial expression alone. These "emotion detectors" have the potential to revolutionise the advertising industry and future security systems. (Feature) Pages 32-35 

'TROJAN' CELLS FIGHT DRUG-RESISTANT TUMOURS 
Scientists from Engeneic in Sydney have created "minicells" loaded with various chemotherapy drugs and antibodies that are capable of destroying tumours in animals. Plans for the future include loading the cells with a greater variety of cancer drugs and different siRNAs to block the production of proteins responsible for drug resistance. Page 11

A NEW MEMBER TO THE BLACK HOLE FAMILY
A team of scientists at the CESR astrophysics lab in Toulouse, France have discovered a source of variable X-rays that they believe is the first "middleweight" black hole consisting of 500 solar masses. The discovery could help explain how black holes grow from small to supermassive. Page 13 

TEEN BABY MAY HOLD ANTI-AGEING SECRETS
An investigation comparing the DNA of a 16-year-old girl locked perpetually in the mind and body of a baby to the DNA of her healthy sisters is hoped to reveal a gene responsible for ageing. The investigation lead by the University of South Florida College of Medicine in Tampa could, one day, allow people to stay forever young. Page 10

DRUG-RESISTANT FLU
Scientists are questioning the benefits of prescribing "prophylactic" doses of drugs to people who have come into contact with those infected with the swine flu. Concerns of handing out these treatments include the emergence of drug-resistant strains. Page 4 

OZONE HOLE PREVENTS OCEAN'S APPETITE FOR CO2
Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris have discovered that decreasing stratospheric ozone and rising greenhouse gases are preventing the Southern Ocean from absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Page 13 

MARIE CURIE TOPS POLL OF THE MOST INSPIRATIONAL WOMEN IN SCIENCE

To celebrate a decade of L'Oréal's For Women In Science programme, New Scientist in conjunction with L'Oréal created a poll to establish the most inspirational female scientists of all time. Results of the poll were finalised yesterday and reveal that nuclear physicist and chemist, Marie Curie topped the poll, with around a quarter (25.1%) of the vote. 

Roger Highfield, Editor, New Scientist commented: "The poll indicates the vital need to celebrate and raise awareness of the many female scientists who have shaped modern science since Marie Curie, and who are making a bigger contribution than ever." 
 
For biographies of all the women included in the poll, click here: http://www.newscientist.com/special/women-in-science-2009-intro 


.......................................................................................
ENDS

Reports on this story must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

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If you'd like to view the above articles in full-text AND/OR for radio & TV interviews, please contact Rita Mu, Marketing and PR Assistant-  Australia, Tel: 61 2 9422 2556 or email: media at newscientist.com.au
 
PRESS CONTACT IN EUROPE: 
Varneek Sehra, New Scientist Press Office, Tel: +44 (0)20 7611 1286 or email: varneek.sehra at rbi.co.uk
 
PRESS CONTACT IN THE US:
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For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit www.newscientist.com

Rita Mu
Marketing and PR Assistant - Australia/NZ
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2556
Email: media at newscientist.com.au














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