[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 11 JULY 2009

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Jul 8 03:03:36 CEST 2009


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 11 JULY 2009 (Vol. 202 No. 2715)

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For full text versions of the articles below, please email
media at newscientist.com.au or call +61 (0)2 9422 2556.

SPACE & APOLLO SPECIAL
More than just a giant leap for mankind, the first space voyage to the
moon was an exploratory expedition that revolutionised our ideas of
planetary formation and evolution. With today's technologies, cracking
Einstein's theory of gravity and recreational space travel are some of
the things to look forward to in future lunar investigations and
missions. (Feature) Pages 28-35 

PARASITIC WORMS TO ALLEVIATE ALLERGIES
Are you disgusted by the idea of parasitic worms burrowing through your
skin? Imagine being prescribed some of these worms to harness your
allergies... New Scientist investigates the radical new therapy of
infecting people with parasitic worms to treat common medical conditions
such as hay fever, eczema and asthma. (Feature) Pages 40-43 

DAWN OF THE ANIMALS
Recent discoveries from Scientists around the world have revealed
astonishing evidence that the first animals could have evolved far
earlier than we thought. Rather than evolving during the Ediacaran
period, the first multicellular animals may have evolved as early as 850
million years ago! (Feature) Pages 40-43


MORE BAD NEWS FOR COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS
Global assessments of coastal ecosystems around the world have confirmed
that a football pitch-sized area of undersea meadow is vanishing every
30 minutes. A team of scientists from James Cook University in
Townsville, Queensland found that the total area of seagrass meadows
decreased by 29 per cent between 1879 and 2006, and the rate of the loss
of these meadows is increasing. Page 10

At Last Dinosaurs in spades
Australia's long dinosaur drought is over with the discovery of three
new dinosaurs, the Australovenator, a big fast predator, and two plant
eating titanosaurs, the giraffe-like Wintononotitan and the massive
elephant-like Diamantinasaurus. The dinosaurs were discovered in the
remains of a 98-million year old billabong in Central Queensland by
Scott Hocknull and his colleagues at the Queensland Museum. Page 15

GOOD DANCERS MAKE FITTEST MATES 
Nadine Hugill and Bernhard Fink of the University of Gottingen in
Germany have found that men whose dancing is rated as attractive and
assertive by women are physically stronger than those whose moves are
below par. Using filters and blurring to disguise the clothing face and
body shape of the dancers, female students were asked to watch videos of
40 males dancing and rate their attractiveness and assertiveness,
resulting in strong correlations with strength. Page 11

DOLL'S HOUSE TO CHANGE HOME INFRASTRUCTURE
The University of Hertfordshire, U.K has developed a project called
InterHome to help cut carbon emissions and energy bills by an estimated
$600 AU. The project revolves around a doll's house technically wired
with a network of infrared sensors connected to a central computer and
uses software algorithms to detect when we do and don't need certain
energy systems turned on. Page 17

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ENDS

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Rita Mu
Marketing and PR Assistant - Australia/NZ
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2556
Email: media at newscientist.com.au














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