[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 18 JULY 2009

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Jul 15 02:58:12 CEST 2009


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 18 JULY 2009 (Vol. 202 No. 2716)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 03:00
HRS AEST (05:00 HRS NZST) THURS 16 JULY 2009. 

All FULL-TEXT articles together with artwork, photos and graphics are
not to be downloaded and reproduced without prior permission from New
Scientist. The articles are distributed in advance of publication to
those authorised media who may wish to report on our stories, quoting
extracts as part of fair dealing with this copyrighted material.

Reports on this story must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com 

SYDNEY'S MOON ROCK WINNER!
THE WINNER of a piece of moon rock, the most popular competition ever
staged by New Scientist, is announced today!

Our competition to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Apollo moon
landing asked New Scientist readers to imagine something Armstrong might
have said instead. 

>From an impressive 5500 entries all over the world, the New Scientist
team have finally found their winner.

The winner is: Richard Hambly from Potts Point, New South Wales,
Australia, for his entry: "Hi Yuri, can we just keep this between the
two of us?"

When he was informed that he had won the prize, Mr Hambly declared
(predictably) "I'm over the moon."

"I have had to wait 72 years for my 15 minutes of fame but better late
than never."

"I had very low expectations of landing the prize because having seen a
number of these competitions over the years the standard is
astronomically high," said Mr Hambly, who refers to New Scientist as "my
Bible."
 
He will receive an engraved Perspex box containing the fragments of a
lunar meteorite, which was found in the desert by French collector Luc
Labenne and verified by Prof Colin Pillinger, Dr Richard Greenwood and
colleagues at the Open University. 

Read some of the best entries at www.NewScientist.com/feedback.


For full text versions of the articles below, please email
media at newscientist.com.au or call +61 (0)2 9422 2556.

THE CALORIE DELUSION
Will you have that brownie or that muesli bar? For die-hard dieters and
serious calorie counters, dietary information from food labels can no
longer be entirely trusted. Researches have discovered that the amount
of energy that you will get from certain foods can be underestimated by
as much as 25 per cent on many food labels! New Scientist finds out how
and why this is possible. (Feature) Pages 30-33 

ALTERNATIVE BATTERY POWER ON THE RISE
With the effects of climate change kicking in, the urgency for
alternative and environmentally friendly energy sources is becoming
greater. Scientists and engineers are proposing an all-electric economy-
with battery-operated cars being the biggest focus. New Scientist
investigates which batteries would cut the deal and why. (Feature) Pages
42-45 

DINOSAURS DUG DEEP TO FIND WINTER WARMTH 
The discovery of three fossil burrows in Victoria suggests Dinosaurs may
have dug down in winter. The burrows identified by Tony Martin of Emory
University in Atlanta, Georgia would have given small plant-eating
dinosaurs a place to conserve energy and refuge during times when
vegetation was lacking and when the sun lay below the horizon for weeks
or months. Palaeontologist Tim Rich from Museum Victoria in Melbourne
visited the burrows with Martin and hopes to continue the investigation
further. Page 14

FLU VACCINE DELAY
As the death toll for the swine flu increases, the demand for a vaccine
is even greater. However before a vaccine can be made available to
everyone, vaccine companies must first fill existing pandemic vaccine
contracts with countries such as the U.K, Australia and France. For an
effective vaccine to be developed, the quantity and rate of the growth
of current vaccine strains is a vital factor. Good news- The World
Health Organisation estimates contracts can be fulfilled by as early as
November 2009. Page 7

GENES DRIVE IQ MORE AS KIDS GET OLDER
New studies by a team of scientists at King's College London have found
that as kids grow older their genes are the dominant factor that drives
their intelligence, proving previous studies that variations in
intelligence had very little do with genetics. Up to 66 per cent of a
young adult's intelligence is driven by their genes! The studies may
have implications for future education systems. Page 10

ONLY THE CROOKS WILL STAND OUT
Innocent people can now go about their daily chores under public
surveillance cameras without feeling their identity could be meddled
with. 3VR, a surveillance technology company based in San Francisco have
developed a system that uses patented face-recognition algorithms to
focus on known, suspect faces in crowds, whilst unknown faces will be
simply blurred. Page 19

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ENDS

Reports on this story must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com 


PRESS CONTACT IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND:
If you'd like to view the above articles in full-text AND/OR for radio &
TV interviews, please contact Rita Mu, Marketing and PR Assistant-
Australia, Tel: 61 2 9422 2556 or email: media at newscientist.com.au
 
PRESS CONTACT IN EUROPE: 
Varneek Sehra, New Scientist Press Office, Tel: +44 (0)20 7611 1286 or
email: varneek.sehra at rbi.co.uk
 
PRESS CONTACT IN THE US:
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j.heselton at elsevier.com
 

For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit
www.newscientist.com

Rita Mu
Marketing and PR Assistant - Australia/NZ
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2556
Email: media at newscientist.com.au















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