[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 07 MARCH 2009

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Mar 4 00:29:55 CET 2009


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 7 MARCH 2009 (Vol. 201 No. 2698)

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DECIDING WHO LIVES 
Conservationists are facing the question of which species should we
save? Kerstin Zander and colleagues of Charles Darwin University are
looking at conserving cattle - the species with the most number of
breeds to go extinct. Zander and her team have adopted economist Martin
Weitzman's formula developed in 1990 that looks at how we should
prioritise species for conversation. Page 6

"BLOOD PASSPORTS" TO BE USED IN COURT
Blood samples submitted by athletes over-time during their sporting
careers could now be used as evidence in court cases. The International
Cycling Union (UCI) who has been piloting the "athlete's passport"
scheme has collected around 8300 blood samples from 804 cyclists. The
World Anti-Doping Agency plans to release standardised protocols so that
laboratories can start using the scheme to test for illicit drug use by
athletes. Page 7

THE CANCER DIET
The most comprehensive report on cancer prevention yet (produced by the
World Cancer Research Fund) has found that healthy eating and exercise
could prevent more than a third of common cancers in developed countries
and more than a quarter in developing countries. Page 7

FART MOLECULE COULD BE NEXT VIAGRA
The stink of flatulence and rotten eggs could provide a surprising lift
for men according to researchers at the University of Naples Federico
II. Hydrogen sulphide causes erections in rats and may one day provide
an alternative to Viagra. Page 14


DARK FORCES AT WORK 
A mysterious substance called dark matter has troubled cosmologists
trying to understand the universe for years. Now there are tantalising
signs that we know what it is - and it is turning out to be even weirder
than anyone thought. Page 28-31

SEAFOOD'S SLIMY FUTURE 
With fish stocks plummeting and climate change destroying marine
ecosystems, seafood lovers may have to get used to some pretty
unpalatable-looking alternatives. Jellyfish and chips, anyone? Page
40-43

OBAMA'S BIG GAMBLE
The stimulus bill and Obama's 2010 budget request together represent an
avalanche of funding for science and technology. We've had longer-term
efforts in specific areas like the Apollo project, but in this case the
money is raining down over a two-year period - in terms of dollars/per
year it's arguably the biggest spending initiative ever. Page 8-9

ER 2.0 
The Trauma Pod, a mobile "operating theatre in-a-box" equipped with a
team of robotic surgeons and nurses, could one day rescue severely
wounded soldiers from the battlefield and perform emergency procedures
while transferring them to hospital. Page 18-19


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