[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 21 NOVEMBER 2009

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Nov 18 01:49:55 CET 2009


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 21 NOVEMBER 2009 (Vol. 202 No. 2734)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 04:00
HRS AEDST (06:00 HRS NZDST) THURS 19 NOVEMBER 2009. 

All FULL-TEXT articles together with artwork, photos and graphics are
not to be downloaded and reproduced without prior permission from New
Scientist. The articles are distributed in advance of publication to
those authorised media who may wish to report on our stories, quoting
extracts as part of fair dealing with this copyrighted material.

Reports on this story must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com 

THE 1000MPH CAR
The race is on to build a car that will absolutely smash the sound
barrier. Three research teams from Australia, the UK and the US/Canada
are competing to break the current land speed record of 763mph and
create a vehicle that can travel at 1000mph.  G forces of 16, liquefying
surfaces and delivering the enormous amounts of fuel required to propel
jet and rocket engines are just some of the challenges being overcome in
the effort to produce the world's fastest car. Feature. Pages 38-41 

DON'T DIG, DIVE TO DISCOVER ANCIENT CIVILISATIONS
Underwater research is the next big thing in archaeology, with
civilizations from 11,500 to 6,000BC occupying lands that now lie 50
metres below sea level. Unearthing underwater remains is a
time-consuming and costly way of discovering the past but it may be the
only way we will be able to find out how our ancestors migrated and
evolved. Construction, dredging and pollution along coastlines means
that researchers must act quickly before sites are lost. Feature. Pages
47-49 

RISE OF THE MEDIBOTS
The surgeons of the future will be too small to see with several groups
developing surgical devices that are just a few millimetres in size. The
first generation of "mini-medibots" may infiltrate our bodies through
our ears eyes and lungs to deliver drugs, take tissue samples or install
medical devices. Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University in the USA
say that combining keyhole surgery with these devices could reduce major
surgeries like coronary surgery to outpatient procedures. Feature. Pages
50-53 


TIME TRAVEL HITS THE WEB
The Library of Congress in Washington has created a new system called
Memento which allows users to access specific web pages from a certain
date without having to navigate through deep archives of old web pages.
Page 23 

BUILT-IN CIRCUITS TURN CONTACT LENSES INTO GRAPHIC DISPLAYS
Electronic devices are getting smaller and smaller, however what happens
when they get so small their screens become barely visible? Babak Parviz
and colleagues at the University of Washington in Seattle are doing away
with the screen, and instead are hoping to generate images from within
contact lenses. The project, involving nanoscale and microscale devices
in materials such as paper and plastic, will be presented at the
Biomedical Circuits and Systems conference at Beijing later this month.
Page 26 

BEATING COMPUTER VIRUSES FROM THE MOMENT THEY APPEAR
Engineers at the defence technology company, Qinetiq's security lab in
the U.K have an idea that could revolutionise our current antivirus
systems. It involves a fast-acting program which intercepts every file
that could possibly hide a virus and a string of computer codes which
disable each of the viruses found. Page 26 


........................................................................
............
ENDS

Reports on this story must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com 


PRESS CONTACT IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND:
If you'd like to view the above articles in full-text AND/OR for radio &
TV interviews, please contact Rita Mu, Marketing and PR Assistant -
Australia, Tel: 61 2 9422 2556 or email: media at newscientist.com.au
 
PRESS CONTACT IN EUROPE: 
Varneek Sehra, New Scientist Press Office, Tel: +44 (0)20 7611 1286 or
email: varneek.sehra at rbi.co.uk
 
PRESS CONTACT IN THE US:
New Scientist Boston office: Tel: +1 617 386 2190 or email:
j.heselton at elsevier.com
 

For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit
www.newscientist.com

Rita Mu
Marketing and PR Assistant- Australia/NZ
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2556
Email: media at newscientist.com.au
























This e-mail is for the use of the intended recipient(s) only.  If you have
received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately and then
delete it.  If you are not the intended recipient, you must not use, disclose
or distribute this e-mail without the author's permission.  We have taken
precautions to minimise the risk of transmitting software viruses, but we
advise you to carry out your own virus checks on any attachment to this e-mail.
We cannot accept liability for any loss or damage caused by software viruses.


More information about the ASC-media mailing list