[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 28 NOVEMBER 2009

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Nov 25 01:16:03 CET 2009


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 28 NOVEMBER 2009 (Vol. 202 No. 2735)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 04:00
HRS AEDST (06:00 HRS NZDST) THURS 26 NOVEMBER 2009. 

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For full text versions of the articles below, please email
media at newscientist.com.au or call +61 (0)2 9422 2556.

INCONSPICUOUS CONSUMPTION
Sometimes small things make a big difference. Even if you shun bottled
water, buy local produce and reuse your plastic bags, chances are that
you have some habits that are far more environmentally damaging than you
realise. In this feature, New Scientist looks at the impact that coffee,
toilet paper, gadgets, fast fashion, laundry and food wastage are having
on our environment. You may disagree with the choices on the list, but
what's not in doubt is that the cumulative effects of our everyday
decisions can make a big difference to the global environment. Feature.
Pages 43-47 

SUPERSHIPS
In August this year, a physicist from New York University outlined his
design for a spacecraft powered by dark matter. Soon afterwards,
researchers from Kansas State University proposed plans for a craft
powered by an artificial black hole. No one disputes that building a
ship powered by black holes or dark matter would be a formidable task.
Yet remarkably there seems to be nothing in our present understanding of
physics to prevent us from making either of them. Feature. Pages 34-37 

DEEP SECRETS
The potential excavation of underwater sites has received a lot of
attention in recent months, but what's really out there under the waves?
>From ancient Egyptian trading ports, to the former "wickedest city on
earth" to villages dating from 7000 BC, New Scientist looks at some of
the sunken towns and cities discovered worldwide, and separates the
facts from the myths. Feature. 38-42 


THEIR BREATH ON YOUR SKIN HELPS YOU HEAR The latest research by the
University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada has revealed that
tactile sensations such as breathing on someone's skin can help improve
understanding of speech and hearing. The discovery could lead to
advanced hearing aids that emit puffs of air. Page 16

RECENT EVOLUTION SAVED CANNIBALS
A genetic mutation protecting against kuru - a brain disease developed
as a result of eating human brains - is one of the most clear-cut
examples of human evolution in action today, according to scientists at
University College London. The "anti-kuru" gene, suggested to have
emerged and spread in the past 200 years was found to exist in various
Fore people in Papua New Guinea who practiced the ritual of eating human
brains in the 20th century. Page 20 

PLAY THAT FUNKY MUSIC, TWEET BOY
Musical twitterers have found a way to condense entire compositions of
song into single 140-character tweets. Using the language programmer,
SuperCollider, tunes several minutes long - and containing more than 140
notes - can be efficiently notated in 140 or fewer characters simply by
incorporating code that denotes repeating sequences. Sample tracks can
be found at: newscientist.com/article/dn18173. Page 23

3D MAPS THAT LET YOU 'EDIT' THE WORLD
It's SimCity at its best: the 3D maps of the future are full-colour,
large-scale and more accurate than any map before. With accuracy down to
15-20 centimetres (in comparison - 3D structures in Google Earth are
accurate to about 15 metres), the maps of the future could soon change
the way we design, manage and relate to our urban environment. Page
24-25 


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ENDS

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Rita Mu
Marketing and PR Assistant- Australia/NZ New Scientist
Tel: 61 2 9422 2556
Email: media at newscientist.com.au
























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