[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 17 OCTOBER 2009

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Oct 14 01:52:58 CEST 2009


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 17 OCTOBER 2009 (Vol. 202 No. 2730)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 02:00
HRS AEDST (04:00 HRS NZDST) THURS 15 OCTOBER 2009. 

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For full text versions of the articles below, please email
media at newscientist.com.au or call +61 (0)2 9422 2556.

THE DISEASES YOU NEVER KNEW YOU COULD CATCH
Bacteria or viruses could be to blame for illnesses once thought to be
caused by genes or unhealthy lifestyles. Like stomach ulcers, could
diabetes, obesity, schizophrenia, breast cancer, obsessive compulsive
disorder and prostate cancer some day be treated by antibiotics,
anti-virals or even prevented with a vaccine? Feature. Pages 46-49 

RAT IN YOUR MOBILE PHONE
It's a camera, diary, navigator, wallet and social secretary all rolled
into one. So if your smartphone falls into the wrong hands, how much
could it reveal about you? As our reporter found out, the answer is just
about everything. Depending on your applications, the information stored
is more than enough for someone to steal your identity, even if it has
been deleted. Feature. Pages 34-37 


DWINDLING DOOM
Researchers at the University of Adelaide have found the total
population size of a species needs to be at least a few thousand; a lot
more than originally thought, for any hope of long-term survival. The
new findings are hoped to encourage conservation scientists to focus on
protecting and providing resources to low population species sooner.
Page 7

DEALING WITH BOOZE'S DARK SIDE
In a document unveiled last week, the World Health Organisation outlined
it draft of the first global strategy on reducing health damage from
alcohol abuse, the fifth leading cause of premature death and disability
worldwide. Sally Casswell of Massey University in New Zealand, who
helped produce the document, says a focus on passive drinking is the key
to winning public acceptance for more stringent alcohol legislation.
Pages 8-9

SICK DOGS GET NEWEST DRUGS
Unlike mice and rats, dogs experience cancer in similar ways to humans.
Recently, the U.S has allowed pet owners to test experimental drugs -
yet to be available to humans, on their dogs suffering cancer. Currently
12 trials are underway on groups of 15-60 dogs - with the drugs already
proving to be successful in several cases. Page 7

NO MEAT PLEASE, WE'RE SPIDERS
The Bagheera kiplingi, is the first ever species of spider found to
survive on plant matter only. Scientists at the University of Arizona in
Tucson found the spider lives on a protein-rich diet by extracting the
nutrient from the leaves of certain plants. The discovery will provide
scientists with a greater understanding of the evolution of these
creepy-crawlies. Page 18

DIGITAL WORLD'S BENEFITS TRICKLE TO WHERE THEY'RE NEEDED MOST
A pilot project in African refugee camps is using CrowdFlower, a website
that allows companies to quickly outsource routine tasks to help the
poorest of the poor earn an income. Over the past two months workers
have been trained in a range of computer related tasks including data
entry and tagging. The project has so far been a success with workers
earning about $2 an hour compared to a typical monthly income of $50.
Page 24
 
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ENDS

Reports on this story must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

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For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit
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Rita Mu
Marketing and PR Assistant- Australia/NZ
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2556
Email: media at newscientist.com.au



















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