[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 31 OCTOBER 2009

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Oct 28 01:00:46 CET 2009


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 31 OCTOBER 2009 (Vol. 202 No. 2731)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 04:00
HRS AEDST (06:00 HRS NZDST) THURS 29 OCTOBER 2009. 

All FULL-TEXT articles together with artwork, photos and graphics are
not to be downloaded and reproduced without prior permission from New
Scientist. The articles are distributed in advance of publication to
those authorised media who may wish to report on our stories, quoting
extracts as part of fair dealing with this copyrighted material.

Reports on this story must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com 

IT'S HOW YOU USE IT THAT COUNTS
Having a high IQ doesn't necessarily mean you're smart. Far from it, say
researchers from the University of Toronto who have been measuring IQs
for over 15 years. But unlike many critics of IQ testing, they are not
trying to redefine intelligence, but rather focus attention on cognitive
faculties that go beyond intelligence - essential tools of rational
thinking. Recent studies have shown that people who display good
rational thinking skills were better able to apply their problem solving
capabilities and suffered significantly fewer negative events in their
lives, suggesting that rational thinking may be more important than
intelligence for positive life experiences. Feature. Pages 37-39 

SWINE FLU: FACT VERSUS FANTASY
As if the misinformation multiplying on the internet weren't bad enough,
even official advice is sometimes failing to keep up with the latest
finding on 2009 H1N1 flu. In a special report, New Scientist debunks
eight commonly believed myths about swine flu:
*	This is just mild flu, death rates are even lower than for
normal flu 
*	You're safe as long as you're healthy. Only sick, weak people
get really ill 
*	The symptoms are like regular flu. You've got it if you've got a
fever 
*	I'll be OK if I just eat organic food, take vitamins, wear a
mask, wash my hands a lot and drink plenty of fluids 
*	It's OK because now we have a vaccine. In fact, we have several 
*	The vaccine isn't safe - it has been rushed through tests and
the last time there was a swine flu scare the vaccine hurt people. Why
take the risk to prevent mild flu? 
*	This virus won't get deadlier - that isn't in a germ's interests

*	Once this pandemic is over we'll be safe for another few
decades. 
Feature. Pages 40-45 

PREDATOR X
Today, the island of Spitsbergen, accommodates the greatest number of
marine reptiles in the world. New Scientist takes a deep-sea dive into
the history and evolution of our aquatic wildlife and investigates what
happened to some of the world's most monstrous water creatures of all
time including the 11-metre Australian reptile, Kronosaurus, believed to
have lived 100 million years ago. Feature. Pages 32-35 


'GATORADE' FOR FROGS' DELAYS FUNGAL KILLER
Researchers at James Cook University in Townsville have discovered an
oral electrolyte- replacement solution, similar to the Gatorade drink,
which prolongs the life of frogs infected by a deadly fungal disease.
It's the first crucial step towards finding a cure for the disease. Page
18 

THEY KNOW WHAT YOU'RE THINKING
By combining brains scans with pattern-detection software,
neuroscientists are finding ways to "decode" a person's thoughts.
Recently researchers at the University of California, Berkeley were able
to create a crude reproduction of a movie clip simply by analysing the
brain activity of a person watching the movie. Is this "mind reading?"
Could this technology be exploited by advertisers or oppressive
governments? Due to the technology's limitations, researchers argue it
is more of a sort of "neural decoding." Page 8-9 

GENOMIC CURIOUSITY SHOP RAISES ITS GAME
A U.S genome-scanning firm, 23andMe which allows people to take a peek
at their own DNA is now working to encourage more people to participate
in genetics research. The firm which has recently identified new genetic
variants associated with curly hair, the inability to smell asparagus in
one's own urine and the reflex that causes some people to sneeze in
bright light hopes to contribute to more serious health research in the
near future. such as finding the cause of migraines. Page 12 

TUMOURS BLAMED FOR GENETIC DISEASE
Genetic disease is more likely in the children of older fathers, but
why? Researchers from the University of Oxford say part of the answer
may be that benign testicular tumours, more common in older men, give
rise to sperm containing disease causing mutations. Page 19 
HEADACHES AHEAD FOR MISSION CONTROL AS SPACE JUNK PILES UP
An increase in the amount of space debris is going to have a major
impact on the future economics of space flight, according to a
prediction made at the European Air and Space Conference in Manchester
this week. Projections indicate that the number of close encounters
between objects in orbit will rise 50% in the next decade and quadruple
by 2059 and the cost of counter measures will add greatly to the cost of
future missions. Page 24 


........................................................................
............
ENDS

Reports on this story must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com 


PRESS CONTACT IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND:
If you'd like to view the above articles in full-text AND/OR for radio &
TV interviews, please contact Rita Mu, Marketing and PR Assistant -
Australia, Tel: 61 2 9422 2556 or email: media at newscientist.com.au
 
PRESS CONTACT IN EUROPE: 
Varneek Sehra, New Scientist Press Office, Tel: +44 (0)20 7611 1286 or
email: varneek.sehra at rbi.co.uk
 
PRESS CONTACT IN THE US:
New Scientist Boston office: Tel: +1 617 386 2190 or email:
j.heselton at elsevier.com
 

For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit
www.newscientist.com

Rita Mu
Marketing and PR Assistant- Australia/NZ
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2556
Email: media at newscientist.com.au





















This e-mail is for the use of the intended recipient(s) only.  If you have
received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately and then
delete it.  If you are not the intended recipient, you must not use, disclose
or distribute this e-mail without the author's permission.  We have taken
precautions to minimise the risk of transmitting software viruses, but we
advise you to carry out your own virus checks on any attachment to this e-mail.
We cannot accept liability for any loss or damage caused by software viruses.


More information about the ASC-media mailing list