[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 09 JANUARY 2010

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Jan 6 00:50:10 CET 2010


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 09 JANUARY 2010

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 09 JANUARY 2010 (Vol. 202 No. 2742)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 04:00
HRS AEDST (06:00 HRS NZDST) THURS 07 JANUARY 2010. 

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Reports on this story must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com 

NIGHT SIGHT
Australian researcher Eric Warrant's love of dung beetles, nocturnal
bees and moths has been the inspiration behind a night vision camera
system that will help improve vehicle safety in poor lighting
conditions. In close collaboration with Jonas Ambeck-Madsen and
Hiromichi Yanagihara of the Toyota Motor Europe R&D centre and
mathematicians Henrik Malm and Magnus Oskarsson, he developed a new kind
of digital image-processing algorithm. This allowed them to find a way
to capture full colour moving images shot in near-total darkness. Toyota
are currently trialling this technology to determine its best use in
vehicles. Feature. Pages 44-47 

PRESCRIPTION: SOBRIETY
Can alcoholism really be treated with a pill? Mark Willenbring of the US
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) is convinced
that it can be. Positive results from clinical trials, coupled with
advances in the neuroscience of addiction, indicate alcoholism could be
managed with a drug. Propelling this notion forward are big
pharmaceuticals, who have finally taken an interest in developing this
potentially profitable treatment. Feature. Pages 40-43 

LET'S GET PHYSICAL
Scientists broadly agree on the best ways to get fit, they just haven't
been good at telling us what they've discovered. We know that exercise
is necessary for good health, but what counts as exercise? How much
should we do and how often? How do we know if we're actually getting
fit? Does everyone really need to lift weights? Is it possible to be fat
and fit? In this special report, New Scientist distils the research to
find out what it all means for the average person who's trying to get in
shape. 
Feature. Pages 34-39 

BORN IN A BLACK HOLE
An exciting new theory put forward by David Elbaz and his team at the
French Atomic Energy Comission may rewrite cosmic history and have
startling implications for our ultimate origins. Their research points
towards black holes creating galaxies through the emission of jets of
matter at ultra high speeds. This is in direct contrast with previous
theories, but is fast gaining support from leading physicists across the
globe. Feature. Pages 30-33 

FOR JUSTICE, SHARE DNA DATABASES
A group of 41 scientists and lawyers in the US and UK are questioning
the accuracy of assumptions used to match DNA from crime scenes to
potential perpetrators. The assumptions have never been independently
verified on a large sample of DNA profiles. The group have requested
access to CODIS, the US national DNA database, in an attempt to resolve
doubts over the validity of DNA matches used in prosecutions. Pages 8-9 

EGG WHITES: MERINGUES TODAY, BABY SAVIOURS TOMORROW?
Egg whites are being tested as a sealant for the membrane surrounding
developing foetuses. This research, conducted by Ken Moise, is a
positive step towards preventing breaches of the membrane that cause a
mother's water to break early, resulting in miscarriage. Page 16

ARTIFICIAL LEAVES COULD BE FUTURE SOURCE OF ENERGY
Materials scientists have created an artificial leaf that can harness
light to split water and generate hydrogen. Researchers are trying to
mimic photosynthesis by copying the architecture of a green leaf. The
work is a good start to unlocking a future source of clean energy. Page
21 


The following article is for IMMEDIATE RELEASE. Please click on the link
below to view the full-text article.

GENE RICE ON ITS WAY IN CHINA
Genetically modified rice cleared for commercial sale could be growing
on Chinese farms as early as next year, making China the first country
to allow commercial cultivation of GM strains. 
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn18328-gene-rice-on-its-way-in-chin
a.html?full=true&print=true



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ENDS

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Nicole Scott
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New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2893
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