[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 30 JANUARY 2010

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Jan 27 01:13:41 CET 2010


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 30 JANUARY 2010 (Vol. 202 No. 2745)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 04:00
HRS AEDST (06:00 HRS NZDST) THURS 28 JANUARY 2010. 

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For full-text versions of the stories below please email
media at newscientist.com.au or call 61 2 9422 2556 

THE TECHNOLOGY BLUNDER
The increasing complexity of society is making civilisation more
vulnerable to environmental disasters. As we generate more information
than ever before, our storage of large amounts of data and information
becomes more fragile, and the greater the risk we are of losing it all.
How long will the longevity of electronic storage media last? Feature
pages 37-39 

THE COMEDY CIRCUIT
Ever wondered why some jokes leave us rolling on the floor, while others
make us roll our eyes. Where does our sense of humour come from?
Neuroscientists pin down how the brain reacts to a joke and how our
sense of humour defines us. Feature pages 40-43 

CHEAP FLIGHTS TO PHOBOS
Next stop, Phobos! Mars' largest moon, Phobos, could be the next stop in
space before we reach the red planet. Its small size and weak
gravitational field makes Phobos a much cheaper and easier option to
send spacecraft to than Mars, or even our own moon. European spacecraft
Mars Express will make its closest fly-by of Phobos in March, while NASA
awaits the outcome of the Augustine report before planning the exciting
mission. Landing on Phobos allows closer examination of Mars while
determining the composition and origin of Phobos. Feature Pages 28-31 

I, VIRUS
Viruses have significantly shaped human evolution, with virus-like
components of the human genome making up almost half of our DNA.
Evidence suggests our evolution involved repeatedly facing epidemics,
resulting in plague-culling followed by periods where viruses and
survivors co-evolved. What might be a plague to us, could be crucial to
the survival of our descendants. Feature Pages 32-35 

PILL TO TURN SOLDIERS INTO SUPER-SURVIVORS 
We may just be one more step closer to immortality thanks to the latest
research by scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.
Hasan Alam and his team have developed a drug which will keep the
injured from going into shock after losing large amounts of blood. The
drug, which has only been tested in animals, is hoped to work
effectively in humans and improve the survival of injured soldiers in
war. Page 13 

FLU IN PREGNANCY CHANGES FETAL BRAIN
Previous research suggested that the brain of a developing foetus is
more likely to be affected if the mother has the flu. Now, scientists at
the University of Wisconsin in the U.S have supporting evidence to show
that this could be true. The brains of monkeys whose mothers had the flu
while pregnant were found to resemble those of people with
schizophrenia. Pages 15 

BENEVOLENT HACKERS POKE HOLES IN E-BANKING
Banks are so secretive when developing online banking security measures
that external testing rarely occurs. This means any flaws in the
security, whether obvious or not, can only be identified by security
researchers once the system has been deployed. Pages 18-19 

........................................................................
.........
ENDS

Reports on this story must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

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For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit
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Rita Mu
Marketing and PR Assistant-- Australia/NZ
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2556
Email: media at newscientist.com.au




























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