[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 19 JUNE 2010

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Jun 16 03:02:10 CEST 2010


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 19 JUNE 2010 (Vol. 202 No. 2765)

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media at newscientist.com.au or call 61 2 9422 2556 

WORKER BEES LAY SEEDS OF REVOLUTION
Madeleine Beekman and Ben Oldroyd of the University of Sydney, Australia
removed the queen bee and her eggs from eight colonies, only to discover
that worker bees then began laying eggs to raise as a queen. This shows
how cooperation in honeybees is tied to genetic relatedness. Page 16 

SPECIAL REPORT: THE GENOME 10 YEARS ON
What has changed in the decade since the sequencing of the human genome?
Feature pages 30 - 37 

*          SLOW REVOLUTION: How has the human genome project changed our
lives? While some individuals have had their lives shaped or even saved
thanks to genome testing, the benefits have yet to become widespread and
readily available. Pages 32 - 33
*         RNA RULES, OK: The genome project has produced some unexpected
discoveries but there is still much more to learn. Pages 34-35
*         WHERE NEXT? The hunt is on for common genetic variants
responsible for common diseases, potentially paving the way for new
treatments. Pages 36 - 37

DESKTOP COSMOS
As yet no experiment has delivered a conclusive result to prove or
disprove the current theory of gravity. However, sites such as the Laser
Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, hope to discover the
ripples in space-time known as gravitational waves. Feature pages 38 -
41 

STOP THE ROT
Plastic is indestructible, isn't it? Plastic items have found their way
into museums and while once thought indestructible, these items are
rapidly degrading, soon to be lost forever. Is there a way to save our
plastic heritage? Feature pages 42 - 45 

VACCINE KILLS FLU VIRUS 'BY A THOUSAND CUTS'
A new vaccine developed by virologist Steffan Mueller at Stony Brook
University in New York, and team, could be the key to effective flu
prevention. The vaccine contains the same proteins as the flu strain it
targets except its genome has been "rewritten" to produce a virus that
replicates too slowly to cause infection. So far only tested in mice,
the team of scientists suggest the vaccine could elicit a stronger
immune response in humans than traditional vaccines. Page 14

ONLINE MUSINGS COULD PREDICT THE FUTURE
Blogs and tweets could provide a cheaper, more accurate way of
forecasting sales and trends. The volume of particular search terms used
in a given period can help forecast retail sales and unemployment rates,
while nervous sentiments in blog postings could predict stock market
behaviour. Pages 20 - 21 

THE LIFE SIMULATOR
The Game of Life is a cellular automation where players choose an
initial pattern of "live" cells and then watch as the configuration
changes over many generations. Now, avid player of the 2D mathematical
computer game, Andrew Wade, has introduced a self-replicating
mathematical creature into the game that could tell us a lot about how
life on Earth began. Page 6-7 

THUNDERCLOUD GAMMA RAYS HINT AT ORIGINS OF LIGHTNING
Scientists are beginning to understand how lightning starts. Terrestrial
gamma ray flashes appear during the first few milliseconds of a
lightning strike, suggesting they are involved in the origins of
lightning. Page 16 

REGROWN LIVER COULD BOOST TRANSPLANTS
Livers stripped of their original cells and re-coated with new cells
have been successfully transplanted in rats for the first time. If the
procedure is successful in humans it would enable donated livers to be
re-coated in the recipients cells, reducing the risk of organ rejection.
Page 17 

SPACE SHUTTLE TRICK TO CUT AIRPORT NOISE
Airbus has suggested that airliners coming in to land could be made
quieter by following designs similar to the space shuttle. The space
shuttle slows down using a "spreading rudder" that reducing the need to
use noisy airbrakes. Page 19 


The following article is for IMMEDIATE RELEASE. Please click on the link
below to view the full-text article. 

SEA SNAIL VENOM PROVIDES POTENT PAIN RELIEF
Nerve pains? Take a dose of sea snail venom: it consists of a cocktail
of peptides, known as conotoxins that are an effective analgesic. David
Craik and his team at the University of Queensland in Brisbane,
Australia, have developed the first "orally active" conotoxin drug. The
drug is 100 times as potent as leading treatments for nerve-related
pain.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19044-sea-snail-venom-provides-pot
ent-pain-relief.html

MALE VOICES REVEAL OWNER'S STRENGTH
Men and women can accurately determine a man's upper body strength based
on nothing more than his voice. The exact indicators in the voice are
yet to be determined but these findings indicate the male voice could
have evolved as an indicator of fighting ability.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19045-male-voices-reveal-owners-st
rength.html 

IS IT TIME TO SAY GOODBYE COOL WORLD?
Climate negotiators have spent the past two weeks in Bonn, Germany,
trying to heal the rifts created after last year's failed UN climate
talks in Copenhagen. It seems that any global deal on climate change
will not be based on science and that it's unlikely the increase in
greenhouse gas emissions can be slowed in the next decade.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20627650.401-is-it-time-to-say-goo
dbye-cool-world.html 
 
WORLD'S FIRST ANTIBODY WORKS IN MICE
Who would have ever thought of plastic antibodies saving lives? A team
led by Kenneth Shea of the University of California have created plastic
antibodies made with cavities moulded in specific shapes to trap target
molecules. The antibodies have been found to save the lives of mice
injected with been venom.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19031-worlds-first-plastic-antibod
y-works-in-mice.html

HIMALAYAN GLACIERS GOOD FOR A WHILE YET
A study by Utrecht University in the Netherlands has revealed that the
Himalayan glaciers may not be thinning as we first thought. Using
satellites known as GRACE to estimate changes between 2001 and 2007 in
the thickness of the glaciers that supply the Indus, Brahmaputra,
Ganges, Yangtze and Yellow rivers, scientists found that many glaciers
either grew or had no change in size.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19029-himalayan-ice-is-stable-but-
asia-faces-drought.html

........................................................................
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ENDS

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Rita Mu
Marketing and PR Assistant - Australia/NZ
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2556
Email: media at newscientist.com.au






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