[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 20 MARCH 2010

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Mar 17 00:52:10 CET 2010


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 20 MARCH 2010 (Vol. 202 No. 2752)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 04:00
HRS AEDST (06:00 HRS NZDST) THURS 18 MARCH 2010. 

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COSMIC LIGHTHOUSES
George Hobbs and his team at Parkes Observatory in New South Wales are
putting Einstein's theory of relativity to the test. In one of three
similar projects around the world, Hobbs' team are trying to detect
gravitational waves by timing the pulses from millisecond pulsars. Will
Einstein be proven correct? Feature pages 30 - 33 

IT'S A BUG'S DEATH
A new generation of pesticides is in the making - with gene silencing as
the key idea. Pesticides could target undesirable species of insects
while leaving other species unharmed. This progress could result in
significant financial and environmental benefits for Australia and New
Zealand. Scientists from both countries are weighing in with their
results, including Richard Newcomb at the Plant and Food Research in
Auckland, New Zealand and Steven Whyard, a former member of Australia's
national insect research institute, CSIRO Entomology in Canberra.
Feature pages 34 - 37 

BRAIN CHAT
Why are we aware of some things and not others? And what happens in our
brains when we register a conscious thought? Researchers are now mapping
neural activity in peoples' brains to see the differences between
conscious and unconscious thought, proving that a flash of coordinated
activity occurs when a thought is registered. Feature pages 38 - 41 

THE MAN WHO SEES THE FUTURE
Bueno de Mesquita can predict the future to 90 per cent accuracy. How?
With a computer program. No, he can't pick the winning lotto numbers but
he can but he can predict the outcomes of strategic events such as
domestic politics, foreign policy, conflicts, business decisions and
social interactions. He has even used the program to predict the outcome
of anti- terrorism efforts. Feature pages 42 - 45 

THE HIDDEN VIRTUE OF SHIPS' POLLUTION
The world's shipping lines are a big contributor to sulphur dioxide
emissions. This coming July, the UN body responsible for regulating
worlds shipping will confirm plans to cut sulphur dioxide emissions by
90 per cent. But the decision comes as a paradox: ships are hazard to
our health but until now they have been doing the environment a favour.
A reduction of sulphur dioxide emissions will mean more sulphate
particles developing in our atmosphere, partially masking the warming
effects of carbon dioxide - a greenhouse gas also produced by shipping
lines. Pages 8-9 

FINGERPRINTS TO GO SCIENTIFIC AT LAST 
Fingerprints can be an excellent source of evidence in crime scene
investigations but they are often considered as "unscientific" proof in
court. Now thanks to new statistical tools, this could change. The new
tools will determine the reliability of "matches" found between a
suspect's prints and prints from a crime scene. Pages 10-11

COOKBOOK THREAT TO FISH
According to a study by the Northwest Fisheries Science Centre in the
U.S, predatory fish such as salmon and tuna have grown in prestige in
the past 100 years despite overfishing causing their populations to
decrease. The study was conducted between 1885 and 2007 on 3092 seafood
recipes in the Seattle region. Page 6

MADE-TO-ORDER MALWARE BECOMES A REALITY
The cybercrime services industry is burgeoning, with malicious software
easily available to people with next to no programming skills. This
provides potential hackers with the tools to steal money or sensitive
documents as well as the support services to make the process easier.
Pages 20 - 21 

MOTION SENSORS TO FIND LOST TROOPS WHEN GPS CUTS OUT
Locating soldiers during combat operations is literally a matter of life
and death, but what happens when the GPS technology used to track them
cuts out? A UK company is addressing this with the development of a
lightweight, wearable tracker that can find soldiers when the GPS signal
is lost. Page 22 


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ENDS

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Rita Mu
Marketing and PR Assistant-- Australia/NZ
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2556
Email: media at newscientist.com.au

































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