[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 03 APRIL 2010

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Mar 31 02:31:50 CEST 2010


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 03 APRIL 2010 (Vol. 202 No. 2754)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 04:00
HRS AEDST (06:00 HRS NZDST) THURS 01 APRIL 2010. 

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For full-text versions of the stories below please email
media at newscientist.com.au or call 61 2 9422 2556 

GENE BANDAGE TO REJUVENATE WASTED MUSCLE
For the first time in science, Steve Wilton and colleagues at the
University of Western Australia in Perth, Australia have found a way to
recreate a missing, muscle-strengthening protein in boys with Duchenne
Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Their method involves snippets of nucleic
acids binding to sections of messenger RNA which correspond to the DMD
mutations. Page 9 

POINTILLIST STYLE COULD BRING LIFELIKE GRAPHICS TO PCs
Existing graphics software can create virtual objects for home computers
and games consoles using polygons. But the detail of virtual objects is
restricted because of the number of polygons that can be used. Now the
Australian firm, Unlimited Detail, is hoping to take the detail of
computer graphics one step further by using a system of billions of dots
to create a "point cloud." The system of dots is hoped to produce a
detailed 3D snapshot of an object similar to a pointillist painting.
Page 18

SENSORS HELP YOU SERVE AN ACE
The first serve in a tennis game could make or break your chances of
winning. While a high-speed video of a player's serve can be analysed,
this is expensive to do and labour intensive. Now Amin Ahmadi and
colleagues at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia have developed
a cheap, wearable system that gives instant feedback on tennis players'
serves. It involves three matchbox-sized sensors that measure shoulder
rotation, arm angular velocity and wrist bending. Page 15 

NINE BIG BRAIN QUESTIONS
Ever wondered what memories are made of? Why you smile when someone else
smiles? Or why you're smarter (or perhaps not quite as smart) as your
neighbour? The human brain is unimaginably sophisticated, but thanks to
advances in technology and research, the complexities of the brain are
being unravelled. Feature pages 26 - 33

LOOK, NO DRIVER
The days of cars that drive themselves are closer than you would think.
The technology is available and trials are underway. It will only be a
matter of years and maybe even months before semi-autonomous and fully
autonomous vehicles are on the road. The question is: will these cars be
able to reduce the death tolls on our roads? Feature pages 34 - 37 

LIQUID ASSET
The discovery of water on the moon has reinvigorated lunar science,
presenting a wealth of possibilities for space exploration and also
raising questions of the water's origin. However, changes to NASA's
funding earlier this year mean it's not likely we'll be setting foot on
the moon any time soon. Feature pages 38 - 41 

MONSOONS SEND ASIAN POLLUTION AROUND THE WORLD
According to experts of the U.S National Centre for Atmospheric Research
in Colorado, millions of tonnes of soot, sulphur dioxide and other
pollutants across Asia are fast-tracked in the stratosphere each year by
the summer monsoon. Page 10 

PARALYSED LIMBS REVIVED BY HACKING INTO NERVES
Paralysed limbs could be brought back to life. A new generation of
devices are in the making, potentially allowing people to regain control
over paralysed arms and legs. The devices inject messages into the
nerves to control muscles just as if the signals had originated in the
brain. Pages 16 - 17 


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ENDS

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Rita Mu
Marketing and PR Assistant-- Australia/NZ
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2556
Email: media at newscientist.com.au


































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