[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 09 OCTOBER 2010

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Oct 6 02:23:24 CEST 2010


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 9 OCTOBER 2010 (Vol. 202 No. 2781)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 05:00
HRS AEST (07:00 HRS NZST) THURS 7 OCTOBER 2010. 

Reports on stories must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com
<http://www.newscientist.com/>  

EATING SKIPPY
Is kangaroo farming the way of the future for Australians? The
environmental benefits of kangaroo farming are convincing, while the
health benefits of eating kangaroo meat are equally persuasive. But will
the Australian palate and agricultural industry shift to kangaroos
instead of sheep and cattle? Feature Pages 42 - 45 

DENGUE DEFENCE
Scott O'Neill of the University of Queensland, Australia, and colleagues
have found a fruit-fly bacterium that makes mosquitoes less able to
carry the virus and also halves their lifespan, which is important as
only elderly mosquitoes transmit the disease. The first mosquitoes
infected with the bacteria will be released into the wild next year.
Page 6  

50 IDEAS TO CHANGE SCIENCE: PART ONE LIFE AND EARTH In part one of this
special series, New Scientist explores the ideas that will revolutionise
science. From artificial cells, genomes and enzymes to mental maps and
geo-engineering, find out what advances really will make a difference to
our future. Feature Pages 32 - 41 

RELATIVITY GOES LARGE
For the very first time we are in a position to put one of the pillars
of modern physics to the test on the biggest scale possible. As we
approach the centenary of Einstein's theory of relativity, we are
extremely close to being able to check if this theory has been right all
along or if we should have been paying more attention to the
alternatives. Feature Pages 46 - 49 

THE CITY WITH A BRAIN
The planned city of PlanIT Valley, on the outskirts of Paredes in
Portugal is aiming to be the first fully-built environmentally
sustainable city. With completion scheduled for 2015, this eco-city
boasts one major difference that sets it apart from other eco-cities in
development. PlanIT Valley will have a brain, a central computer system
that regulates everything from water use to energy consumption. Pages 22
- 23 

NO WAY TO CHECK EMISSIONS PUTS CLIMATE DEAL IN DANGER The annual United
Nations climate change summit kicks off in December, but preparatory
talks indicate any deal may fail as emissions cannot yet be measured
with sufficient accuracy. The uncertainties relate to current estimates
of not only gases emitted but also gases stored and absorbed by forests.
Page 12  

...AS VATICAN CONDEMNS IVF NOBEL
Religious leaders have again expressed their opposition to IVF,
condemning the decision to honour Robert Edwards, the man who gave the
world IVF, with the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. However, the
panel that awards the prize insists this medical advancement offers a
great benefit to mankind. Page 7

AFTER THE SPILL: LOUISIANA REVIVAL
A key environmental question that remains after the Deepwater Horizon
oil spill is whether or not we should intervene to remove the oil or let
nature take its course. There are advocates for both sides as well as a
number of small-scale intervention methods that could encourage a
speedier recovery. Pages 8 - 10 

The following articles are for IMMEDIATE RELEASE. Please click on the
links below to view the full-text articles. 

DAILY CHOICES CAN AFFECT LONG-TERM HAPPINESS A study conducted by Bruce
Headey of the University of Melbourne, Australia has found that certain
changes in lifestyle can lead to significant long-term changes in
reported life satisfaction. Leading the way as influencing factors are
your partner's level of neuroticism, your priority on altruistic
behaviours and family values and your religious commitments.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19545-daily-choices-can-affect-lon
gterm-happiness.html
<http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19545-daily-choices-can-affect-lo
ngterm-happiness.html> 


CENSUS OF MARINE LIFE REVEALS EXTENT OF OCEAN MYSTERY The first global
Census of Marine Life has been completed, but the decade-long exercise
has only scratched the surface. While 1200 new species have been
identified, it's thought that for every known species, there are another
three to four unknown species. The census provides a baseline for
diversity in the oceans and will be essential for conservation efforts.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19535-census-of-marine-life-reveal
s-extent-of-ocean-mystery.html
<http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19535-census-of-marine-life-revea
ls-extent-of-ocean-mystery.html>  

THIGHS AND ABS HAVE A DIFFERENT TAKE ON FAT Ever wondered why you store
fat on your hips while others store it around the middle? Research
suggests that cells in different parts of the body store fat
differently. Learning exactly how and why the cells do this could help
limit the detrimental effect of fat on our health.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19546-thighs-and-abs-have-a-differ
ent-take-on-fat.html
<http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19546-thighs-and-abs-have-a-diffe
rent-take-on-fat.html>  


AUDIO ZOOM PICKS OUT A LONE VOICE IN THE CROWD The days of trash talking
on the sports field may soon be numbered. A new microphone system will
allow broadcasters to zoom in on sounds, to pick out a single
conversation in a packed stadium. The sonar technology, dubbed
AudioScope, is being tested with basketball and soccer teams and could
have interesting implications for televised sport.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19541-audio-zoom-picks-out-lone-vo
ice-in-the-crowd.html
<http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19541-audio-zoom-picks-out-lone-v
oice-in-the-crowd.html>  

........................................................................
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ENDS

Reports on this story must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com
<http://www.newscientist.com/>  

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<mailto:media at newscientist.com.au> 

PRESS CONTACT IN EUROPE: 
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PRESS CONTACT IN THE US:
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Kimberly.karman at newscientist.com
<mailto:Kimberly.karman at newscientist.com> 

For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit
www.newscientist.com <http://www.newscientist.com/> 

Lucy Dunwell
Marketing and PR Manager
New Scientist
Tel: 61 2 9422 2893
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