[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 16 OCTOBER 2010

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Oct 13 02:23:03 CEST 2010


 
NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 16 OCTOBER 2010 (Vol. 202 No. 2782)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 05:00
HRS AEST (07:00 HRS NZST) THURS 14 OCTOBER 2010. 

Reports on stories must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com
<http://www.newscientist.com/>  

FEEL GOOD, STAY HEALTHY
High self-esteem has benefits beyond just making you feel good. Andy
Martens from the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand
has shown that high self-esteem has physical benefits like protecting
the heart and immune system. Page 17 

OPINION SPECIAL: MORALITY
In this 9 page special, leading scientists take a controversial look at
the origins of morality. By using science to unpick the complex
reasoning behind our system of values, they reveal the potential of the
human mind to create moral frameworks which benefit mankind. Feature
pages 41 - 49
*        SCIENCE WAKES UP TO MORALITY: Exposing the role of evolution in
shaping our consciences.
*        FROM 'IS' TO 'OUGHT': A novel scientific approach to ethics.
*        THAT WARM, FUZZY FEELING: Human nature is exposed through the
kindness of babies.
*        OUR HIDDEN JUDGEMENTS: How hidden moral judgements shape our
universe.
*        CRUSADER FOR SCIENCE: Who needs morality? Science can show us
the difference between right and wrong.
*        VIRTUAL MORALITY: Virtual reality technology enables us to
predict human reactions to moral dilemmas.
*        ROOTS OF RIGHT AND WRONG: The brain processes and chemicals
behind our moral judgements.
*        MY BRAIN MADE ME DO IT: The legal implications of acknowledging
the scientific roots of morality.


50 IDEAS TO CHANGE SCIENCE: PART TWO PHYSICS, SPACE AND TECHNOLOGY Part
two of this special series continues to explore the ideas that will
revolutionise science. This week's focus is on the groundbreaking
developments that are creating a buzz in the worlds of physics, space
and technology. Feature pages 32 - 40 

THE CHAOS THEORY OF EVOLUTION
Could changing environmental factors such as climate change have shaped
the way in which we evolved? New Scientist takes a fresh look at fossils
and Darwinism in this effort to understand the effects of nature's
unpredictability. Feature pages 28 - 31 

PRICE TAGS FOR PLANET EARTH
A group of environmental economists have put a cash value on nature.
This aims to highlight the economic value of conservation, particularly
in the eyes of politicians. While not all ecosystems have an easily
defined value, the figures do provide an indication of the immediate
economic benefits of biodiversity. Pages 8 - 9 

HOW CLIMATE CHANGE COULD FLATTEN CITIES
The strain of climate change is causing the Earth to crumble, literally.
Rock avalanches and landslides have become more common in high mountain
ranges and appear to coincide with the increase in warm periods. Studies
have shown that a similar strain occurred at the end of the last ice
age, approximately 10,000 years ago and the events were catastrophic.
Page 14 

ANCIENT TATTOOS LINKED TO HEALING RITUAL Tattoos found on a
1000-year-old Peruvian mummy may have been part of an ancient healing
ritual. Tattoos around the mummy's neck contained plant material, as
opposed to ash and soot, the usual material used to make ancient
tattoos. The position of the tattoos, along with the substance used to
make them, suggest it could have been part of a healing or strengthening
ritual. Page 16 

THE FASTEST CHOPPERS ON THE BLOCK
Helicopters aren't really that fast, with most travelling at half the
speed of a plane. Given they are used in some extremely time sensitive
situations, it might be time to try and speed them up a bit. That's what
Sikorsky Aircraft in the US and Eurocopter in Germany thought. Both
companies have developed experimental craft that could increase the
speed of helicopters within a matter of years. Pages 20 - 21 

A ROBOT MAY NOT INJURE A HUMAN BEING...VERY MUCH According to the sci-fi
world, the first law of robotics states that a robot may not injure a
human. So why then are experiments underway where robots are hitting
people? The tests involve a robot repeatedly hitting a person's arm with
varying force in an attempt to define the speed an acceleration at which
robots can safely interact with humans. Page 22  

The following articles are for IMMEDIATE RELEASE. Please click on the
links below to view the full-text articles. 

FIRST PERSON TREATED IN MILESTONE STEM CELL TRIAL In a world first, a
person paralysed by spinal injuries has received an authorised treatment
derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). It is hoped the trial
will help restore some movement for the patient, while ensuring the
treatment is safe.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19570-first-person-treated-in-mile
stone-stem-cell-trial.html
<http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19570-first-person-treated-in-mil
estone-stem-cell-trial.html>  

CHANGES CAUSED BY SMOKING BLOCK TUMOUR-FIGHTING GENES The first direct
evidence has been found linking smoking to epigenetic changes in genes
that help fight cancer. Not only has this link been found, but when
participants gave up smoking during the trial, the changes were shown to
reverse.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19574-changes-caused-by-smoking-bl
ock-tumourfighting-genes.html
<http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19574-changes-caused-by-smoking-b
lock-tumourfighting-genes.html>  

........................................................................
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ENDS

Reports on this story must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

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Lucy Dunwell
Marketing and PR Manager
New Scientist
Tel: 61 2 9422 2893
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