[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 9 APRIL 2011

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Apr 6 03:23:35 CEST 2011


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 9 APRIL 2011 (No. 2807)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 04:00 HRS AEST (06:00 HRS NZST) THURS 7 APRIL 2011. 

Reports on stories must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com 

CORAL REEF COUNTDOWN
At the Greenhouse 2011 conference in Cairns this week, Ove Hoegh-Gulberg of the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia declared we have only 10 years to save the Great Barrier Reef. If we continue to release CO2 into the atmosphere at the current rates we will soon reach a tipping point beyond which ocean warming will occur no matter what. Page 6 

TECHNOLOGY SPECIAL
In an Australia and New Zealand exclusive, New Scientist explores different technologies and their impact on our lives.
* LET YOUR RADIO WAVES POWER YOUR PHONE: You might soon be able to charge your e-books and mobile phone using radio waves. Page 52
* WHEN GOOD DRUGS GO BAD: The internet is transforming the illegal drug trade, providing clandestine laboratories with easily accessible research on psychoactive substances. Page 53
* ON TRACK FOR AUSTRALIA'S HIGH SPEED RAIL: In July this year a report documenting the feasibility of a high speed rail network in Australia will be released. So what are the benefits and obstacles? Pages 54 - 55
* EFFLUENT MAKES AFFLUENT BIOFUELS: Human excrement could boost the production of algae, a promising source of future biofuels. Page 56 


THE BONUS MYTH
Would an extravagant end of year bonus motivate you? Evidence suggests performance based bonuses and incentives may not be as effective as you might think. What effects can financial incentives have on results? Feature Pages 40 - 43 

CHECK ME OUT, LADIES
David Attenborough depicts the spectacular lengths birds of paradise go to when attracting a mate. Feature Pages 48 - 49 

CIRCUIT TRAINING
There is a growing list of brain stimulation technologies that can manipulate your mind. New Scientist explores some of the most promising emerging technologies that can alter your mind. Feature Pages 34 - 39 

CATCHER IN THE SKY
This month the space shuttle Endeavour will carry some very important cargo as it makes its final voyage to the International Space Station. The Endeavour will be taking the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, a particle detector, in an effort to sift through particles from deep space. Feature Pages 44 - 47 

WIKI CANCER WIPE
A charity has enlisted a legion of experts to seek out and edit inaccurate or ambiguous Wikipedia entries about cancer. Page 6 

CONDEMNED, BUT NOT FOREVER
Little is really known about how, or if, rehabilitation is possible for psychopaths, but brain scans of children with psychopathy-like conditions could change that. Results from these scans could open the door for objective ways to diagnose psychopathy and develop successful therapies. Pages 8 - 9 

WE COULD BATTLE 'ROID RAGE', BUT WOULD THAT BE WISE?
Psychologists are working out how steroids trigger aggressive behaviour in some individuals. With this knowledge comes ways of combating the side effect, but is that a wise and responsible thing to do? Page 12 

PREJUDICE LINKED TO FERTILITY CYCLE
Is racism innate? An experiment at Michigan State University in the US showed that ovulating women were prejudiced against the unfamiliar, echoing the fear of outsiders that was a by-product of evolution. Page 19 

THE 'TREE OF LICE' HINTS AT MAMMALIAN EVOLUTION
Parasitic lice could prove that mammals began evolving much earlier than previously thought. Research at London's Natural History Museum suggests that lice began to diversify while dinosaurs still roamed the earth, implying that their host mammals did also. Page 15 

STEM CELLS GROW INTO PARTIAL EYEBALL
Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Japan have coaxed mouse stem cells into forming a partial eyeball. It may soon be feasible to produce samples large enough for retinal transplants. Page 18 

FIGHTING ONLINE CHILD PORN
The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children in Virginia, USA is using software developed by Google to match patterns in a database of child pornography images. Pages 23 - 24 

TAP YOUR BODY TO CHANGE YOUR TUNE WHILE YOU RUN
A revelation for runners and commuters alike, a new device from Japanese firm NEC will enable you to control your iPod with a mere tap or clap. Page 25 

SOLAR POWER AND DRINKING WATER ALL ROLLED INTO ONE
Electricity and drinking water can be simultaneously produced thanks to a new hybrid solar panel developed by IBM's Zurich Research Laboratory. Water heated in micro-channels on the surface of the solar panel can be used to distil seawater. Page 26 

DARK MATTER, THE BRINGER OF LIFE
Dark matter has been labelled 'the ultimate form of sustainable energy' by scientists at Fermilab in Illinois, USA. It could make otherwise hostile planets susceptible to life. Page 16 

The following articles are for IMMEDIATE RELEASE. Please click on the links below to view the full-text articles. 

FBI CALLS ON CODE BREAKERS TO DECIPHER MURDER CODE
The FBI has asked the public for help deciphering a coded message that could solve a decade old murder. The FBI found 2 encrypted messages in the victims pocket but have failed to decipher them. A website has been set up to collect solution submissions and tips about the case. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20332-fbi-calls-on-codebreakers-to-decipher-murder-notes.html  

CANNABIS-LIKE DRUGS COULD KILL PAIN WITHOUT THE HIGH
Medicinal cannabis relieves pain, but sometimes with unwanted side effects. Scientists at the US National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism have discovered a way to separate the drug's different properties. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20327-cannabislike-drugs-could-kill-pain-without-the-high.html 

.................................................................................
ENDS

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Lucy Dunwell
National Marketing Manager
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2893
Email: media at newscientist.com.au

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