[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 16 APRIL 2011

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Apr 13 03:17:40 CEST 2011


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 16 APRIL 2011 (No. 2808)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 04:00 HRS AEST (06:00 HRS NZST) THURS 14 APRIL 2011. 

Reports on stories must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com 

THE ROACH'S SECRET
Why are cockroaches so successful at colonising our homes? Entomologist Nathan Lo at the University of Sydney is as repulsed by the pests as we are but apparently not all cockroaches are as nasty as the ones that take over our kitchens. Feature Pages 40 - 42 

BUILDING BLOCKS OF CORAL LOST TO ACID
The first survey of ocean acidification supports fears the Great Barrier Reef if on its last legs. The findings were presented at Greenhouse 2011 in Cairns last week. Page 16 

OPINION SPECIAL: THE HAPPINESS AGENDA
In April 2011 the UK is set to become the first nation in the world to officially record the happiness of its citizens. New Scientist explores what this means for individuals, society and politics. Special Feature Pages 46 - 52
* IN PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS: What do we mean by happiness, how do we measure it and what really makes us happy? Page 48 - 49
* DIVIDED WE FAIL: Inequality is the place to start when promoting well-being for all. Pages 50 - 51
* AN UNHEALTHY OBSESSION: For some, the search for happiness has turned into a chore. Page 51
* THE OPTIMIST MANIFESTO: Are there benefits to being relentlessly optimist? Page 52

THE FREE WILL DELUSION
What happens to society if our free will is threatened? Can we still be held accountable for our actions in a deterministic world? New Scientist discusses how the belief in free will and feelings of control can impact our thoughts and actions. Feature Pages 32 - 35 

GO RECONFIGURE
The first programmable materials - a material that can shape and re-shape itself into different functional configurations upon command - are not as far away as you might think. How close are we to all-purpose electronic material and what research is paving the way? Feature Pages 36 - 39 

MAGIC MUSHROOMS CLOSE THE MIND
Psychedelic drugs are often said to expand the mind but a recent study indicates this may not be the case. Volunteers were given psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, to find out if it increased blood flow and brain activity. The results showed blood flow was actually restricted in parts of the brain. The areas of the brain that recorded a decrease are often overactive in people who suffer depression, suggesting psilocybin could be a potential treatment. Page 20 

ANTIDEPRESSANT HELPS NEW BRAIN CELLS TO GROW
Better treatments for depression could be on the horizon thanks to researchers at King's College London who have discovered how antidepressant drugs boost brain cell formation. Page 15 

WHY 30 YEARS OF AIDS IS ONLY THE TIP OF THE ICEBERG
While June marks 30 years since the discovery of AIDS, the virus which causes it has probably been around for 100 years. Scientists discuss why it remained undiscovered for so long. Page 12 

PLAY IT AGAIN, BUT THIS TIME WITH FEELING
The next generation of video controllers could tap into a player's emotional and physiological states to help shape and navigate their virtual worlds. Pages 24 - 25 

SPEAK WITH TONGUES
Many people either can't speak or have impaired speech due to illness or injury. Emerging technologies could provide a voice for these people. A team in the UK are developing a device that detects and interprets facial movements when someone mouths a word. An iPad-sized system that learns to recognise impaired speech and replays a clearer version is also being developed. 

'EBOLA' KILLS LAKE FISH
A virus similar to the human Ebola virus has been identified as the cause of death for thousands of fish that clogged up Milwaukee harbour last month. Page 7 

ALGAE ALLOW BLIND MICE TO SEE THE LIGHT
A gene borrowed from algae could restore sight to the blind when inserted into the retina, according to new research from the University of South California. Pages 10 - 11 

SPIKY SECRET OF POLAR CREATURES' ANTIFREEZE
The natural antifreeze present in cold-blooded creatures in frigid polar regions could be used in cancer treatments, to protect healthy tissue while tumours are destroyed by freezing. Page 12 

The following articles are for IMMEDIATE RELEASE. Please click on the links below to view the full-text articles. 

ALOE VERA EXTRACT GAVE RATS TUMOURS
Aloe vera, long believed to promote health of the gut, may cause tumours in the intestines of rats according to new research by the US National Toxicology program. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20365-aloe-vera-extract-gave-rats-tumours.html

MYSTERY SIGNAL AT FERMILAB HINTS AT 'TECHNICOLOUR' FORCE
Scientists at Fermilab in Illinois,US may have glimpsed a particle which, if real, would fall beyond the standard model and could hint at a new force of nature called 'technicolour'. The find would take the focus off the search for the Higgs boson - the last undiscovered particle in the standard model. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20357-mystery-signal-at-fermilab-hints-at-technicolour-force.html

SHIPPING NOISE PULPS 'EARS' OF SQUID AND OCTOPUSES
Submarine noise pollution could be ruining the balancing organs of squid, cuttlefish and octopuses according to new research from the Technical university of Catalonia in Spain. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20364-shipping-noise-pulps-ears-of-squid-and-octopuses.html

.................................................................................
ENDS

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If you'd like to view the above articles in full-text AND/OR for radio & TV interviews, please contact Lucy Dunwell, National Marketing Manager, Tel: 61 2 9422 2893 or email: media at newscientist.com.au
 
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For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit www.newscientist.com
Lucy Dunwell
National Marketing Manager
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2893
Email: media at newscientist.com.au




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