[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 23 APRIL 2011

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Apr 20 02:56:06 CEST 2011


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 23 APRIL 2011 (No. 2809)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 04:00 HRS AEST (06:00 HRS NZST) THURS 21 APRIL 2011. 

Reports on stories must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com 

MYSTERY OF THE MISSING MATTER
A galactic case of hide-and-seek? Atomic matter in deep space that was there a billion or so years after the big bang has seemingly disappeared. New Scientist follows the hunt for the missing matter. Feature pages 32 - 35 

WHAT'S IN A WEDDING?
Wills and Kate - happily ever after? Beneath the fairytale frills and romance of the impending royal wedding lie the age-old imperatives of sexual conflict that have shaped the evolution of human nature. New Scientist measures up the match. Feature pages 36 - 39 

NOTORIOUS B I G
Ever since an apple thudded on Isaac Newton's head 300 years ago, scientists have puzzled over the meaning of gravity - big G. New Scientist explores the trials and tribulations of pinning down the gravitational constant. Feature pages 44 - 47 

CALLING INDIA'S SEX WORKERS
India's call-girls have embraced mobile technology - 97 per cent of sex workers in Bangalore have cellphones. Social workers are making use of the trend by sending prostitutes automated voice messages to remind them to get tested, take medicine or repay loans. Page 21 

AVOIDING EVOLUTION'S PREGNANCY TRAPS
Miscarriages could be due to a lack of quality control during egg-making according to two new studies. The findings could offer hope for new treatments. Pages 8 - 9 

LION HUNTING IN THE CALIFORNIA WILDS
With the aid of GPS, ecologists are tracking how California's mountain lions are adapting to life in a habitat increasingly fragmented by human infrastructure. New Scientist takes a walk on the wild side. Page 12 

COVERT FRAGMENTATION HELPS EMBED SECRETS
Encryption can be an obvious way of hiding a secret. Instead 'steganography', a method of hiding data in plain sight, is becoming the spy's best friend. Page 22 

REARRANGING THE FURNITURE? LET SOFTWARE DO IT FOR YOU
Rearrange your lounge without moving so much as a coffee table. The Make it Home program takes the virtual design of your room into its own hands, automatically generating a number of ideas about how to best place your furniture. Page 23 

ULTRAFAST FIBRE OPTICS SET NEW SPEED RECORD
A new world record has been set for sending 100 terabits of information per second through a single optical fibre, marking a milestone in fibre capacity. Page 24 

SPOOF PAYMENTS TRICKED ONLINE RETAILERS INTO SENDING GOODS
A series of flaws in payment software saw a group of computer security researchers able to shop online for free. The holes leave numerous retailers vulnerable to criminal exploitation. Page 24 

The following articles are for IMMEDIATE RELEASE. Please click on the links below to view the full-text articles. 

STARBURST MEGAQUAKE: JAPAN QUAKE OVERTURNS GEOLOGY
Last month's Japan megaquake has prompted experts to rethink the theoretical frameworks associated with quakes whilst also reassessing the areas at risk around the world. New Scientist reports on the latest findings. http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21028093.600-starburst-megaquake-japan-quake-overturns-geology-theories.html

BEAR DNA IS CLUE TO AGE OF CHAUVET CAVE ART
Animal paintings and cave bear bones are historical treasures found in a hidden cavern in South-West France. Analysis of the bones suggests the art is between 29,000 and 37,000 years old, supporting previous radiocarbon dating of the images. http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21028093.900-bear-dna-is-clue-to-age-of-chauvet-cave-art.html

 'TENDEX' LINES HELP VISUALISE BLACK HOLES
Einstein's theory that space-time warps around massive objects, such as black holes, has long been difficult to visualise, but no longer thanks to a team of physicists from Cornell University in the US. 'Tendex' and 'vortex' lines can show how gravity warps space. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20379-tendex-lines-help-visualise-black-holes.html

BROCCOLI HELPS CLEAR DAMAGED LUNGS
Wonder-vegetable broccoli may help the immune system clean harmful bacteria from the lungs - good news for smokers. Researchers at John Hopkins University in the US are trialling a new treatment for lung disease using a compound found in the vegetable. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20378-broccoli-helps-clear-damaged-lungs.html

.................................................................................
ENDS

PRESS CONTACT IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND:
If you'd like to view the above articles in full-text AND/OR for radio & TV interviews, please contact Anne Majumdar, Tel: 61 2 9422 2887 or email: media at newscientist.com.au
 
PRESS CONTACT IN EUROPE: 
New Scientist Press Office, Tel: +44 (0)20 7611 1286 or email: Louise.Dowding at newscientist.com
 
PRESS CONTACT IN THE US:
New Scientist Boston office: Tel: +1 781 734 8778 or email: Kimberly.karman at newscientist.com

For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit www.newscientist.com
Anne Majumdar
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2887
Email: media at newscientist.com.au





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