[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 30 APRIL 2011

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Apr 27 04:38:16 CEST 2011


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 30 APRIL 2011 (No. 2810)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 04:00 HRS AEST (06:00 HRS NZST) THURS 28 APRIL 2011. 

Reports on stories must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com 

TIME TO PACK IT IN
Earlier this month, the Australian government revealed plans to remove all branding from cigarettes and their packaging. Simon Chapman, professor of public health at the University of Sydney discusses why this landmark move is a triumph for public health. Pages 22 - 23 

THE HUNT IS ON FOR MILLION-YEAR-OLD ICE
What is it that swings the Earth into an ice age? By analysing air trapped in tiny bubbles deep within Antarctica's ice, scientists could start to understand what drives major changes in Earth's climates. Page 12 

AUTOMATED UMPIRE KEEPS CRICKET MATCHES MOVING
Umpires may be relieved of the tricky task of judging if a batsman has been 'run out' thanks to a new computer vision system called A-Eye which eliminates the need for time-consuming video replay. Page 20 

UNCERTAINTY ENTANGLED
Heisenberg's notorious uncertainty principle is being shaken up once again by a new possibility - that there is a relationship between uncertainty and entanglement that has previously been overlooked. New Scientist discusses the effects of quantum weirdness. Feature pages 28 - 31 

UNNATURAL SELECTION
>From pollution to pesticides, humans are changing the face of Earth. New Scientist discusses how these changes are driving modern evolution. Feature pages 32 - 37 

BEAM RIDERS
A new kind of rocket science using beams of microwaves could ease mankind's struggle into space. New Scientist examines the new technology and its implications for the exploration of space. Feature pages 38 - 41 

OUR FORGOTTEN YEARS
The years before we start school are largely a blur. New Scientist investigates where the memories of our first few years go. Feature pages 42 - 45 

GULF SPILL ONE YEAR ON
A year on from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and scientists are still awaiting funding to explore what damage has been done. Page 4 

ASH RISK CONFIRMED
Many questioned the wisdom of closing European airspace after the volcano eruption in Iceland last year, but the dangers to aircraft have now been confirmed by researchers at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Page 4 

SEARCH FOR THE CLIMATE REFUGEES
Six years ago, the UN endorsed the statement that by the end of 2010, there would be 50 million climate refugees. However, the figures have failed to appear to support the claim. New Scientist investigates where the victims are and why they haven't been counted. Pages 6 - 7 

PUSH TO DEFINE YEAR SPARKS TIME WAR
Official bodies representing geologists and chemists have settled on the annus as their definition of the year in an effort to unite the communities. However, the move has enraged many within the scientific community. New Scientist discusses the pros and cons. Page 10 

MIND-CONTROLLED ROBOTIC ARM TO HELP AMPUTEES
Robotic limbs controlled by the mind are currently being trialled by monkeys with electrodes implanted in their brains. The technology could be available to people within a year taking prosthetic technology to a whole new level. Page 11 

FROZEN KILLER'S A HOT TARGET
In-flight icing, which caused the demise of Colgan Air flight 3407 near Buffalo in the US, could be prevented by new software programs which calculate the probability and severity of icing. Page 17 - 18 

SHOW ME THE QUICK WAY HOME
San Francisco commuters are now able to stay ahead of the traffic. The Smart Traveller Research Initiative uses real-time traffic data combined with past traffic patterns to predict congestion up to 40 minutes in advance. Pages 18 - 19 

GOOGLE'S DATA JUNKIE
Peter Norvig and his team at Google have a mission to change the way that we interact with the world. He talks to New Scientist's Peter Aldhous. Pages 26 - 27 

.................................................................................
ENDS

PRESS CONTACT IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND:
If you'd like to view the above articles in full-text AND/OR for radio & TV interviews, please contact Anne Majumdar, Tel: 61 2 9422 2887 or email: media at newscientist.com.au
 
PRESS CONTACT IN EUROPE: 
New Scientist Press Office, Tel: +44 (0)20 7611 1286 or email: Louise.Dowding at newscientist.com
 
PRESS CONTACT IN THE US:
New Scientist Boston office: Tel: +1 781 734 8778 or email: Kimberly.karman at newscientist.com

For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit www.newscientist.com
Anne Majumdar
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2887
Email: media at newscientist.com.au





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