[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 2 APRIL 2011

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Wed Mar 30 02:39:48 CEST 2011


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 2 APRIL 2011 (No. 2806)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL: 05:00 HRS AEST (07:00 HRS NZST) THURS 31 MARCH 2011. 

Reports on stories must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com 

LOUD AND CLEAR
A tiny microphone fully implanted in the ear could soon deliver 24/7 hearing to the deaf thanks to a collaboration between Cochlear, based in Sydney, and Otologics, a Colorado firm. They hope to a complete system working within five years. Page 21 

ELASTIC PATCH CAN HELP HEAL SKIN AND ARTERIES
Grafts could be a thing of the past. Researchers at the University of Sydney have developed flexible tropoelastin patches which could encourage damaged arteries and skin to repair themselves. Page 12 

INSTANT EXPERT: CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE
At present carbon capture and storage offers one of the most direct and rapid ways of reducing CO2 emissions. What is the argument for carbon capture and storage and what are the potential pitfalls? Special Feature Pages i - viii 

EVOLUTION IN THE FAST LANE
High-speed evolution is starting to look like the norm rather than the exception. More and more biologists are warming to this notion, but if it's correct, why do fossil records and genetic studies show a much slower evolution? Feature Pages 32 - 36 

LONESOME GALAXY
New Scientist explores how we will make sense of the cosmos when all the stars have blinked out and our neighbouring galaxies have disappeared from view. Feature Pages 37 - 39 

PIMP MY MEMORY
Many people struggle to remember where they put their house keys, let alone trying to remember a new language or the order of a pack of cards. Improving your memory is more realistic than you might think. New Scientist finds out how the memory masters do it and the tips and tricks to help improve your memory in everyday life. Features Pages 40 - 43 

THE FANTASY OF RENEWABLE ENERGY
Are renewable energy sources limitless? A radical theory has been presented by Axel Kleidon of the Max Plank Institute for Biogeochemistry in Jena, Germany questioning the long-term sustainability of green energy sources. This theory is at the forefront of a new wave of research and is being taken very seriously. Pages 8 - 9 

SALTY COFFINS COULD ENTOMB NUCLEAR WASTE
What to do with our nuclear waste? A study by Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico suggests that burying radioactive waste in underground salt deposits could keep it safely entombed forever. Page 12 

DYE COULD SLOW BRAIN AGEING
The protein misfolding associated with Alzheimer's disease could be prevented by a common dye according to the Buck Institute for Research on Ageing in California. Page 19 

BOT SHOWS SIGNS OF CONSCIOUSNESS
A software bot has taken the same time as humans to complete simple awareness tasks. The bot, inspired by human consciousness, takes us closer to understanding where consciousness comes from and raises the question of whether machines could have subjective experiences. Pages 10 - 11 

GARBAGE-SORTING ROBOT GETS ITS HANDS DIRTY
The future of waste recycling could be robotic thanks to a team of researchers at ZenRobotics in Finland. Their Recycler robot can pick out and categorise pieces of refuse. Page 22 

The following articles are for IMMEDIATE RELEASE. Please click on the links below to view the full-text articles. 

NORTH AND SOUTH KOREA MEET TO DISCUSS VOLCANO THREAT
A rare meeting of scientists from North and South Korea has taken place this week amid fears a dormant volcano may awaken. Hyunga Kim, a Korean studies researcher at the Australian National University in Canberra doesn't believe this meeting will lead to friendlier relations between the two countries. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20307-north-and-south-korea-meet-to-discuss-volcano-threat.html 

MORE ROBOTS SENT IN TO TACKLE CRISIS AT FUKUSHIMA
Robots from Australia and the UK will join Japan's Monirobo radiation-monitoring robot at Fukushima to help stabilize the nuclear plant. http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/onepercent/2011/03/more-robots-to-be-sent-in-to-t.html

CAESIUM FALLOUT FROM FUKUSHIMA RIVALS CHERNOBYL
Radioactive caesium has been deposited in Japan far from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. Caesium-137 has a half life of 30 years, could pose a serious health threat depending on where it lands and whether remediation measures are possible. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20305-caesium-fallout-from-fukushima-rivals-chernobyl.html 

STUXNET ANALYSIS FINDS MORE HOLES IN CRITICAL SOFTWARE
The Stuxnet worm that targeted Iran's nuclear plant has flushed out vulnerabilities in critical systems across the world. With these weaknesses highlighted, it is now possible to fix them before they face a cyber-attack. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20298-stuxnet-analysis-finds-more-holes-in-critical-software.html 

CONTRAILS WARM THE WORLD MORE THAN AVIATION EMISSIONS
Airplane contrails could have more of an effect on atmospheric warming than previously thought according to the Institute for Atmospheric Physics in Germany. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20304-contrails-warm-the-world-more-than-aviation-emissions.html

BLOOD TEST RESCUES FAILING TRANSPLANT ORGAN
A new blood test to check rejection of transplanted organs has been developed at Stanford University in the US. The new test could eliminate the need for painful and invasive heart biopsies. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20301-blood-test-rescues-failing-transplant-organ.html

STRESS HORMONE COMBATS FEAR OF HEIGHTS
Phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder can be helped by a dose of stress hormone cortisol according to scientists at the University of Basel in Switzerland. Cortisol can boost relearning which can help to desensitize people to their fears. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20300-stress-hormone-combats-fear-of-heights.html

.................................................................................
ENDS

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If you'd like to view the above articles in full-text AND/OR for radio & TV interviews, please contact Lucy Dunwell, National Marketing Manager, Tel: 61 2 9422 2893 or email: media at newscientist.com.au
 
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For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit www.newscientist.com
Lucy Dunwell
National Marketing Manager
New Scientist 
Tel: 61 2 9422 2893
Email: media at newscientist.com.au
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