[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 14 JULY 2012

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Jul 11 04:58:00 CEST 2012


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 14 JULY 2012

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 14 JULY 2012 (No. 2873)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL 04:00 HRS AEST (06:00 HRS NZST) THURS 12 JULY 2012.

Reports on stories must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com

SPECIAL REPORT: BEYOND THE HIGGS
The discovery of the world's most wanted boson could kick-start new physics. The particle, thought to be the Higgs boson or at least something similar, could yet break the model that it is credited with completing. Or so most physicists hope. Many properties of the new particle have yet to be tested. It is possible the new particle is something much more exotic, such as a member of a more complete model of the universe. Physicists from ATLAS and CMS at last week's the International Conference on High Energy Physics in Melbourne, Australia suggested there are grounds for cautious optimism. Special Report Pages 6 - 9 Special report written by Michael Slezak, Australasia Reporter. Michael is available for comment.

ROBOT GIVES DESERT LIZARDS A RUN FOR THEIR MONEY
A robot that can scamper across the desert has helped to explain how lizards pull off the trick so effortlessly and could provide insights that will allow better Martian rovers to be built. The results were presented at a robotics conference in Sydney, Australia last week. Page 19

INBREEDING'S EFFECTS COULD BE REVERSED
There's more to inbreeding than dubious genes - how they are 'read" matters too. If a key influence on gene expression is blocked, inbred plants show few signs of their incestuous heritage. The finding may one day help small populations of endangered species breed healthily. However, the effects must last beyond one generation, says Richard Frankham of Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. Page 11

KISSING DEVICE
If you're missing your partner and you fancy a smooch, it's time to pucker up. Well, so long as you don't mind kissing and eyeless Mr Potato Head, that is. A new messaging device, dubbed Kissenger, lets users send kisses wirelessly to one another, mirroring your smooch to your partner. Page 20

AN AIR OF SUPERIORITY
Strong and light, inflatable robots could outdo metal ones at a range of tasks. A New Scientist reporter was the first reporter to ride AntRoach, a 5-metre-long balloon developed by Otherlab, a start-up in San Francisco's Mission district. A laptop was used to navigate the semi-autonomous inflatable robot through a pipe-organ factory. AntRoach could have the edge over metal robots in terms of agility and a softer touch. Page 17

PARENTING BOOSTS RESISTANCE TO COLDS
Children bring many things to their parents' lives: happiness, sleepless nights... and viruses. Although kids share infections with their parents, it seems parents are more resistant to colds and flu, even when the kids no longer live at home. Could that be a result of happiness and reduced stress? Or perhaps parents simply don't have time to get sick. Page 14

THE YUCK FACTOR
Disgust is experienced by all humans, typically accompanied by a puckered-lipped facial expression. It is well established that it evolved to protect us from illness and death but considering all that we know about the psychology of disgust, is it possible to spot and overcome the subtle triggers that influence behaviour? More importantly, would we want to? Pages 34 - 37

IN THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER
Abstract art offers both a challenge and the freedom to play with different interpretations. In some ways, it's not so different to science, where we are constantly looking for patterns and decoding meaning so that we can view and appreciate the world in a new way but what are the neurological secrets that lie behind the most controversial artworks of the last century? Kat Austen investigates. Pages 42 - 45

The following articles are for IMMEDIATE RELEASE. Please click on the links below to view the full-text articles.

FIRST CASE OF ALLEGED STEM-CELL FRAUD ENTERS U.S COURTS
Stem cells hold great medical promise, but only one treatment is licensed in the US and that is for a rare blood disorder. Others are experimental and it is illegal to offer them commercially. Six residents of Los Angeles, California, are suing South Korean company RNL Bio and associates in a Californian court for alleged fraud. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn22039-first-case-of-alleged-stemcell-fraud-enters-us-courts.html

SMART MEDICINE: DIAGNOSING PARKINSON'S IN A PHONE CALL
People may soon be making a very important three-minute phone call - to a computer. Revolutionary technology is being tested where a speech-processing algorithm is being used to diagnose a range of diseases including Parkinson's disease. Could this be the end of invasive physical exams? http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21528726.200-diagnosing-parkinsons-in-a-phone-call-with-a-computer.html

HALF A HEARTBEAT CHANGES OUR RESPONSE TO SCARY IMAGES
New research is beginning to emerge suggesting that our hearts themselves might be responsible for the extent to which we experience fear, rather than merely reacting to scary stimuli. The idea is an extension of what is known as embodied cognition. http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/shortsharpscience/2012/07/half-a-heartbeat-changes-our-r.html

PRESS CONTACT IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND:
If you'd like to view the above articles in full-text AND/OR for radio & TV interviews, please contact Lucy Dunwell, Audience Development Manager, Tel: 61 2 9422 2893 or email: media at newscientist.com.au

PRESS CONTACT IN EUROPE:
New Scientist Press Office, Tel: +44 (0)20 7611 1286 or email: Kimberly.karman at newscientist.com

PRESS CONTACT IN THE US:
New Scientist Boston office: Tel: +1 781 734 8778 or email: Leah.Kinthaert at newscientist.com

For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit www.newscientist.com
Lucy Dunwell
Audience Development Manager
New Scientist
Tel: 61 2 9422 2893
Email: media at newscientist.com.au


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