[ASC-media] NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 28 JULY 2012

RBI - NewScientist - Media (RBI - AUS) media at newscientist.com.au
Wed Jul 25 04:31:09 CEST 2012


NEW SCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 28 JULY 2012

PRESS RELEASE

NEW SCIENTIST MAGAZINE ISSUE DATE 28 JULY 2012 (No. 2875)

THESE MAGAZINE STORIES ARE EMBARGOED FOR PRINT OR BROADCAST UNTIL 04:00 HRS AEST (06:00 HRS NZST) THURS 26 JULY 2012.

Reports on stories must credit NEW SCIENTIST as the source.

Reports online must include a link to www.NewScientist.com

HIV GIVEN NOTICE
Pioneers of HIV research last week announced a united goal: to stamp out the virus forever. Sharon Lewin of the Alfred Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, is one of 34 founders of the global scientific strategy called "Towards an HIV Cure." Page 5

SUBMARINE HEATWAVE TRANSFORMED THE SEAS
Heatwaves aren't just a problem for humans. They can reshape marine ecosystems too. Daniel Smale at the University of Western Australia in Perth and colleagues surveyed an area of the sea off Australia's west coast and noted the drastic changes to the ecosystem compared to the previous year. Page 13

IT'S DIRTY WORK - JUST THE JOB FOR ROBOTRUCK
Trucks nearly as tall as three-storey buildings are a common sight in the Pilbara region in Australia, but not all the trucks are occupied by humans. Mining can be back-breaking and downright dangerous work so many mining companies are turning to Artificial Intelligence to increase production and improve safety. Pages 18 - 19

SPERM IDENTITY PARADE COULD FIGHT INFERTILITY
Not all sperm are created equal. The first genetic comparison of individual sperm cells has revealed just how diverse they can be. The technology used to study these tiny cells might also be used to study cancer and screen eggs for use in IVF. Page 10

CAN A SPICY PILL HELP YOU LOOSE WEIGHT?
A daily capsule of spicy ingredients such as chilli pepper or cinnamon could help fight obesity. The simple food supplement aims to mimic the effects of being cold to burn more unwanted fat. Page 12

WHAT'S THE MOST POPULAR WORD?
What are the most popular words and phrases? 5.2 million books published over five centuries have been examined to determine the most common words and phrases used. The Pope has slipped in the rankings. In 1520 "of the Pope" was the most common three-word phrase, but in 2008 that changed to "one of the". Page 14

ONE AND ONLY YOU
There are about 7 billion of us alive now and by some estimates about 100 billion people have lived and died in the past 50,000 years. As far as we know each of them is, or was, a total one-off. Caroline Williams discovers the 11 things that make us unique. Feature Pages 32 - 36

GHOST IN THE ATOM
Almost 90 years on, and the quantum theory is still our very best description of the microscopic world of atoms and their constituents. The wave function however remains an enigma but is there new evidence that there is more to it than meets the eye? The ghost in the atom may yet prove to be more real than we ever imagined. Feature Pages 28 - 31

SPECIAL REPORT: THE AGE OF INEQUALITY
We've always known inequality to be a major political issue but does it really matter that the richest 1 per cent control a huge proportion of the world's wealth? Who are these people? How did inequality evolve in the first place and why do we always want more? As the divide between the top percentile and everyone else widens, inequality seems to be an issue that will not go away. The question now is what does inequality mean for our health? Feature Pages 37 - 45

The following articles are for IMMEDIATE RELEASE. Please click on the links below to view the full-text articles.

INFLATABLE SPACECRAFT MAKES SUCCESSFUL SPLASH LANDING
NASA's IRVE-3, the third and heaviest of a series of inflatable re-entry vehicle experiments was successfully launched from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. While the launch of IRVE-3 was not intended to show off a finished product, "it demonstrates that the technology is valid, and can be scaled up for future mission applications", says Hughes. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn22094-inflatable-spacecraft-makes-successful-splash-landing.html

WHERE YOU LOOK PREDICTS WHAT YOU'RE GOING TO SAY
A new study shows that it is possible to guess what sentences people will use to describe a scene by tracking their eye movements.
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn22093-where-you-look-predicts-what-youre-going-to-say.html

PRESS CONTACT IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND:
If you'd like to view the above articles in full-text AND/OR for radio & TV interviews, please contact Lucy Dunwell, Audience Development Manager, Tel: 61 2 9422 2893 or email: media at newscientist.com.au

PRESS CONTACT IN EUROPE:
New Scientist Press Office, Tel: +44 (0)20 7611 1286 or email: Kimberly.karman at newscientist.com

PRESS CONTACT IN THE US:
New Scientist Boston office: Tel: +1 781 734 8778 or email: Leah.Kinthaert at newscientist.com

For breaking science and technology stories everyday visit www.newscientist.com
Lucy Dunwell
Audience Development Manager
New Scientist
Tel: 61 2 9422 2893
Email: media at newscientist.com.au


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