<HTML>
<HEAD>
<TITLE>FW: FASTS TOP 10 for 2004</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY>
<FONT FACE="Verdana"><BR>
</FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE="Verdana">------ Forwarded Message<BR>
<B>From: </B>David Denham &lt;fasts@anu.edu.au&gt;<BR>
<B>Date: </B>Mon, 12 Jan 2004 11:51:02 +1100<BR>
<B>To: </B>david denham &lt;fasts@anu.edu.au&gt;<BR>
<B>Subject: </B>FASTS TOP 10 for 2004<BR>
<BR>
</FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE="Verdana"><BR>
</FONT><BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE="Verdana"><FONT SIZE="6"><B>FASTS <BR>
</B></FONT>Science and Technology for the Social, Environmental and Economic Benefit of Australia<BR>
<BR>
<FONT SIZE="5">MEDIA RELEASE<BR>
</FONT> <BR>
<FONT SIZE="5"><B>Science like &#8216;a gently pricked balloon&#8217;<BR>
</B> <BR>
</FONT>12 January, 2004 &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<BR>
<BR>
Science in Australia is still afloat, but only just.<BR>
<BR>
Scientists today compared it to a pricked balloon, slowly losing height and being easily outstripped by the efforts of other countries.<BR>
<BR>
While funding initiatives in Australia over the last few years have been welcome, they have not been enough to retain our position in the international race to forge a modern economy.<BR>
<BR>
Professor Snow Barlow, President of the Federation of Australian Scientific and Technological Societies (FASTS), said that other countries were racing past Australia by increasing their funding for science and research.<BR>
<BR>
&#8220;Only a substantial injection of new funds can solve the problem,&#8221; he said. &nbsp;&#8220;The Government has an ideal opportunity when it announces plans for a successor to Backing Australia&#8217;s Ability.&#8221;<BR>
<BR>
He said that Australia gets top marks for the ingenuity of its researchers, but ingenuity cannot match the new investment other nations are pouring into the field.<BR>
<BR>
&#8220;There seems to be a national failure in Australia to realise the urgency of the situation,&#8221; he said. &nbsp;&#8220;It&#8217;s as though we have taken an extended holiday from reality.&#8221;<BR>
<BR>
Professor Barlow pointed to plans of other countries to lift their research ability, with Europe, Japan, the USA and Canada all determined to make significant investment in their research and education base.<BR>
<BR>
&#8220;The European community has set a target for investment in research to reach 3 per cent of GDP by 2010. We are currently investing about half that amount, and ultimately this is going to tell,&#8221; he said. &nbsp;&#8221;You can do things on the cheap for only so long.&#8221;<BR>
<BR>
He said the increase of permanent departures from Australia of young and talented people was symptomatic of the lack of investment in science and research.<BR>
<BR>
&#8220;Permanent departures from Australia have increased by 146 per cent since the early nineties,&#8221; he said.<BR>
<BR>
&#8220;Not all these people are scientists, but scientists will be well-represented in the highly qualified young professionals fleeing overseas to find better pay, better facilities, more modern equipment and greater career opportunities.&#8221;<BR>
<BR>
Professor Graeme Hugo&#8217;s report on brain drain, released on December 18, showed that one in twenty three Australians lived overseas, nearly twice the rate of Americans living overseas.<BR>
<BR>
&nbsp;&#8220;In the most part these are highly qualified young professionals, exactly the sort of people Australia needs to retain. &nbsp;<BR>
<BR>
<B>For interview and information:<BR>
<BR>
Professor Snow Barlow, FASTS President &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;0407 251 574 &nbsp;<BR>
<BR>
Dr Ken Baldwin, Policy Committee Chairman: 02 6125 4702 (W) 6295 1562 (H) &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<BR>
<BR>
Dr David Denham, FASTS office &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;02 6257 2891 (W) 02 6295 3014 (H)<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<HR ALIGN=CENTER SIZE="3" WIDTH="95%"></B><BR>
<BR>
<FONT SIZE="5"><B>FASTS Ten Top Issues for 2004<BR>
</B></FONT><BR>
<BR>
<B>1. BRING ON &quot;BACKING AUSTRALIA'S ABILITY II&quot;<BR>
</B><BR>
BAA was a first step to invest in Australian science. It's time to take the second step and increase our national investment to match the OECD average.<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<B>2. RETAIN OUR BRIGHT YOUNG RESEARCH SCIENTISTS<BR>
</B><BR>
Recent science graduates have plenty of employment opportunities, but postdoctoral researchers have run into a career bottleneck. &nbsp;&nbsp;The best ideas will flourish if BAA II creates attractive career opportunities in research and industry. <BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<B>3. PhD SCIENCE GRADUATES TO INVIGORATE INDUSTRY<BR>
</B><BR>
BAA II should provide matching Government funds to employ new PhD graduates in industry for 2 years, to bring fresh scientific ideas for new methods and new products, and to forge science-based industry career paths.<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<B>4. ENCOURAGE INDUSTRY TO BE MORE INVENTIVE<BR>
</B><BR>
Give increased tax breaks on a sliding scale to reward companies prepared to increase their investment in research, because enterprising and inventive companies grow and provide more jobs.<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<B>5. ATTRACT VENTURE CAPITAL INTO NEW INDUSTRIES<BR>
</B><BR>
Venture capital is in short supply. Make it more attractive to invest in new ideas and new industries that have long term payoffs by lowering capital gains tax for long term investments.<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<B>6. NOW WE HAVE THE MAP, AUSTRALIA NEEDS A COMPASS <BR>
</B><BR>
The National Mapping exercise has shown us where we are. We should create a plan for up to 10 years into the future that sets goals and national directions, including national action plans on limiting climate change and on sustainable energy strategies.<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<B>7. HECS BREAKS FOR SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS TEACHERS<BR>
</B><BR>
Science and maths teachers are in short supply in Australia, but they pay higher HECS fees than other teachers and thus take home less pay. &nbsp;Bring in HECS breaks for science graduates when they take on teacher employment.<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<B>8. COLLABORATION, NOT COMPETING SILOS<BR>
</B><BR>
Destructive competition between separate research organizations for the funding dollar limits research outcomes. &nbsp;Provide more collaborative funding incentives to build on the different strengths of universities and Government funded research agencies.<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<B>9. QUALITY SCIENCE GRADUATES<BR>
</B><BR>
Quality science and technology graduates are vital to Australia's economic and environmental future. We need measures to ensure that the new Higher Education Funding arrangements help reverse the current decline in higher education science enrolments.<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
<BR>
<B>10. WE ARE NOW 20 MILLION AND GROWING<BR>
</B><BR>
Australia is a fragile continent with an expanding population. &nbsp;We need to develop a scientifically based population strategy that takes into account limits to growth determined by, for example, water resources and soil salinity.<BR>
<BR>
<B><BR>
For interview and information:<BR>
<BR>
Professor Snow Barlow, FASTS President &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;0407 251 574 &nbsp;<BR>
<BR>
Dr Ken Baldwin, Policy Committee Chairman: 02 6125 4702 (W) 6295 1562 (H) &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<BR>
<BR>
Dr David Denham, FASTS office: &nbsp;&nbsp;02 6257 2891 (W) 02 6295 3014 (H)<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<HR ALIGN=CENTER SIZE="3" WIDTH="95%"><BR>
</B></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><FONT FACE="Verdana"><BR>
<BR>
------ End of Forwarded Message<BR>
</FONT>
</BODY>
</HTML>