<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN">
<HTML>
<HEAD>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META NAME="Generator" CONTENT="MS Exchange Server version 5.5.2658.2">
<TITLE>NEWSCIENTIST PRESS RELEASE 14 AUGUST ISSUE</TITLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY>

<P ALIGN=CENTER><B><U></U></B><A NAME="_MailAutoSig"><B><U><FONT SIZE=4 FACE="Arial">RADIO EXTRA</FONT></U></B></A><B></B><B><FONT SIZE=4 FACE="Arial"></FONT></B><B></B><B> <FONT SIZE=4 FACE="Arial">NEWSCIENTIST</FONT></B><B></B><B> <FONT SIZE=4 FACE="Arial">STORIES FROM 14 AUGUST 2004 ISSUE</FONT></B></P>
<BR>

<P ALIGN=LEFT><B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">I MISSED THAT, COULD YOU REWIND</FONT></B> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Ever been listening to a programme on radio and wished you could hear some of it again? Thanks to the falling price of high capacity memory chips</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">, you now can. A new breed of digital radios will let you rewind to the start of a programme or instantly replay a short segment. Television is also moving in the same direction to give you back that missed goal or try.</FONT><B></B><B> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Page 20</FONT></B><B></B></P>

<P ALIGN=LEFT><B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">ARE YOU TOO SEXY FOR YOUR N</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">AME?</FONT></B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial"> Your attractiveness to the opposite sex could depend partly<BR>
on your name. Linguists in the US have found that the sound produced by vowels in a name can affect your appeal. Men with a short vowel sound in their names</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">-</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">such as the "a" in Matt</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">-</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">were rate</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">d sexier than those with a longer vowel, like the &quot;aw&quot; sound in Paul. For women, it</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">'</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">s just the opposite.</FONT><B></B><B> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Page 16</FONT></B><B></B></P>

<P ALIGN=LEFT><B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">DO COSMIC RAYS HOLD SWAY OVER CLIMATE?</FONT></B> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">The argument that cosmic rays could be driving global warming by influencing cloud cover will receive a</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial"> boost at a conference next week. But some scientists dismiss the idea and worry that it will detract from efforts to curb rising levels of greenhouse gases.</FONT><B></B><B> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Page 10</FONT></B><B></B></P>

<P ALIGN=LEFT><B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">GENE OFF-SWITCH PUTS US IN CHARGE</FONT></B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial"> The discovery that genes can be "silenced" is creating a stir in medicine. It could open new avenues for fighting disease. One team, for instance, is already planning to try and shut down a gene that the HIV virus needs to enter cells.</FONT><B> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Page 12</FONT></B></P>

<P ALIGN=LEFT><B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">CANCER UNPLUGGED</FONT></B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial"> Recent evidence which points to links between can</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">cer and cell metabolism and growth is transforming our view of the condition. It suggests a new way of tackling cancers of all kinds</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">-</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">using existing drugs to slow cancerous growth.</FONT><B></B><B> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Pages 34-37</FONT></B><B></B></P>

<P ALIGN=LEFT><B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">SMART GLASS BLOCKS INFRARED WHEN HEAT IS ON</FONT></B> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">UK scientists have developed a type of g</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">lass that continues to let through light but blocks heat when a room starts getting too warm. Above about<BR>
29</FONT> <FONT FACE="Symbol" SIZE=2>&#176;</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">C, a coating on the glass undergoes a chemical change which causes it to become opaque to infrared radiation.</FONT><B><I> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">New Scientist's free public website at</FONT></I></B> <A HREF="http://www.newscientist.com"><B><I><U><FONT COLOR="#0000FF" SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">http://www.newscientist.com</FONT></U></I></B></A></P>

<P ALIGN=LEFT><B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">TAGS TO BANISH FORGETFULNESS</FONT></B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial"> Soon, your wristwatch will be able to remind you not to leave your keys at work, or your mobile phone in a café. American engineers have developed a tracking system based on electronic ID tags. The idea is that you tag all the items you would normally carry about. Then, if you leave any of them behind, your watch notices, beeps and displays a message.</FONT><B> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Page 19</FONT></B><B></B></P>

<P ALIGN=LEFT><B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">COMMENT AND ANALYSIS: NOTHING LIKE THE TRUTH</FONT></B> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">In the US, the polygraph or lie detector is still the most popular tool for ferreting out the guilty. Strange, says psychologist</FONT><B> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">David Lykken</FONT></B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">. Not only is it easy to beat, there is no evidence that it works.</FONT><B> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Page 17</FONT></B></P>

<P ALIGN=LEFT><B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">IT'S CURTAINS FOR VIDEO PIRATES</FONT></B> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">M</FONT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">ovie moguls are pulling out all stops to put an end to the bootleggers who are draining their profits.</FONT><B> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Page 22</FONT></B><B><I></I></B></P>

<P ALIGN=LEFT><B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">FLYING BLANKETS THREATEN SATELLITES</FONT></B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial"> Faint mysterious objects, which NASA believes are thin sheets of insulation torn from old satellites, are becoming a danger to those satellites still at work.</FONT><B> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Page 4</FONT></B></P>

<P ALIGN=LEFT><B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Verdana">PLEASE MENTION NEWSCIENTIST AS THE SOURCE OF ALL ITEMS, AND IF PUBLISHING ONLINE PLEASE CARRY A HYPERLINK TO</FONT></B> <A HREF="http://www.newscientist.com"><B><I><U><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">http://www.newscientist.com</FONT></U></I></B></A><B></B></P>
<BR>

<P ALIGN=LEFT><B><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Verdana">For contacts and interviews:</FONT></B></P>

<P ALIGN=LEFT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Verdana">Australia: &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Kristy Bain - Media Manager:&nbsp; +61 (0)2 9422 2897 or</FONT><I></I><I><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Verdana"></FONT></I> <A HREF="mailto:media@newscientist.com.au"><B><I></I></B><B><I><U><FONT COLOR="#0000FF" SIZE=2 FACE="Verdana">media@newscientist.com.au</FONT></U></I></B></A><I></I><I></I></P>

<P ALIGN=LEFT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">New Zealand:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Marion Karalus:</FONT> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Verdana">+64 (0)9 625 3075 or</FONT> <A HREF="mailto:Mkaralus@gordongotch.co.nz"><B><I></I></B><B><I><U><FONT COLOR="#0000FF" SIZE=2 FACE="Verdana">Mkaralus@gordongotch.co.nz</FONT></U></I></B></A></P>

<P ALIGN=LEFT><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Europe (and for access to the press website):&nbsp;</FONT> <FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Verdana">Claire Bowles - Press Officer: +44 (0)20 7331 2751 or</FONT> <A HREF="mailto:claire.bowles@rbi.co.uk"><B><I></I></B><B><I><U><FONT COLOR="#0000FF" SIZE=2 FACE="Verdana">claire.bowles@rbi.co.uk</FONT></U></I></B></A></P>
<BR>
<BR>

<P ALIGN=LEFT></P>


<P><FONT size=2>This e-mail is for the use of the intended recipient(s) 
only.&nbsp; If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender 
immediately and then delete it.&nbsp; If you are not the intended recipient, you 
must not use, disclose or distribute this e-mail without the author's 
permission.&nbsp; We have taken precautions to minimise the risk of transmitting 
software viruses, but we advise you to carry out your own virus checks on any 
attachment to this e-mail.&nbsp; We cannot accept liability for any loss or 
damage caused by software viruses.</FONT></P>
</BODY>
</HTML>